Hurricane-Driven Patterns of Clonality in an Ecosystem Engineer: The Caribbean Coral Montastraea annularis

Nicola L. Foster, Iliana Brigitta Baums, Juan A. Sanchez, Claire B. Paris, Iliana Chollett, Claudia L. Agudelo, Mark J.A. Vermeij, Peter J. Mumby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

K-selected species with low rates of sexual recruitment may utilise storage effects where low adult mortality allows a number of individuals to persist through time until a favourable recruitment period occurs. Alternative methods of recruitment may become increasingly important for such species if the availability of favourable conditions for sexual recruitment decline under rising anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Here, we test the hypotheses that asexual dispersal is an integral life history strategy not only in branching corals, as previously reported, but also in a columnar, 'K-selected' coral species, and that its prevalence is driven by the frequency of severe hurricane disturbance. Montastraea annularis is a long-lived major frame-work builder of Caribbean coral reefs but its survival is threatened by the consequences of climate induced disturbance, such as bleaching, ocean acidification and increased prevalence of disease. 700 M. annularis samples from 18 reefs within the Caribbean were genotyped using six polymorphic microsatellite loci. We demonstrate that asexual reproduction occurs at varying frequency across the species-range and significantly contributes to the local abundance of M. annularis, with its contribution increasing in areas with greater hurricane frequency. We tested several competing hypotheses that might explain the observed pattern of genotypic diversity. 64% of the variation in genotypic diversity among the sites was explained by hurricane incidence and reef slope, demonstrating that large-scale disturbances combine with local habitat characteristics to shape the balance between sexual and asexual reproduction in populations of M. annularis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere53283
JournalPloS one
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2013

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Cyclonic Storms
Anthozoa
Reefs
Hurricanes
hurricanes
Asexual Reproduction
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
corals
Engineers
asexual reproduction
Coral Reefs
reefs
Acidification
Climate Change
Bleaching
Climate
Climate change
Oceans and Seas
Microsatellite Repeats

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Foster, N. L., Baums, I. B., Sanchez, J. A., Paris, C. B., Chollett, I., Agudelo, C. L., ... Mumby, P. J. (2013). Hurricane-Driven Patterns of Clonality in an Ecosystem Engineer: The Caribbean Coral Montastraea annularis. PloS one, 8(1), [e53283]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0053283
Foster, Nicola L. ; Baums, Iliana Brigitta ; Sanchez, Juan A. ; Paris, Claire B. ; Chollett, Iliana ; Agudelo, Claudia L. ; Vermeij, Mark J.A. ; Mumby, Peter J. / Hurricane-Driven Patterns of Clonality in an Ecosystem Engineer : The Caribbean Coral Montastraea annularis. In: PloS one. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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Foster, NL, Baums, IB, Sanchez, JA, Paris, CB, Chollett, I, Agudelo, CL, Vermeij, MJA & Mumby, PJ 2013, 'Hurricane-Driven Patterns of Clonality in an Ecosystem Engineer: The Caribbean Coral Montastraea annularis', PloS one, vol. 8, no. 1, e53283. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0053283

Hurricane-Driven Patterns of Clonality in an Ecosystem Engineer : The Caribbean Coral Montastraea annularis. / Foster, Nicola L.; Baums, Iliana Brigitta; Sanchez, Juan A.; Paris, Claire B.; Chollett, Iliana; Agudelo, Claudia L.; Vermeij, Mark J.A.; Mumby, Peter J.

In: PloS one, Vol. 8, No. 1, e53283, 15.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Foster, Nicola L.

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