Hybrid laser arc welding process evaluation on DH36 and EH36 steel

C. Roepke, S. Liu, S. Kelly, Richard Martukanitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of laser power, arc power, and laser-arc separation on the macrostructure, microstructure, and welding arc were characterized in hybrid laser arc welds on DH36 and EH36 steels. Experiments were done to study a range of arc and laser powers at a constant laser-arc separation and a range of laser powers and laser-arc separation at a constant arc power. High-speed video captured images of the welding in process, and arc voltage and current were also measured. Two distinct weld macrostructure morphologies were observed. The first had a uniform fusion zone, and the second had a two- part fusion zone with an upper laser and arc combined region and a lower laser-only penetration region at the root. This two-part fusion zone was only observed for partial joint penetration welds, and process parameter maps were made to define the windows for both morphologies. Complete penetration welds always exhibited a uniform fusion zone. Decreasing the laser-arc separation increased the total penetration of the uniform fusion zone welds and reduced the size of the laser-only penetration region in the two-part fusion zone welds. The formation of acicular ferrite was promoted by increasing the arc power and increasing the laser-arc separation. Laser power did not have a major effect on the weld metal microstructure. Small laser-arc separations and low laser powers added a low-frequency large globular/short circuiting metal transfer mode to the predominately spray arc. Welding with larger laser-arc separations and higher lasers powers did not exhibit this low-frequency transfer but did have a mid frequency small globular free-flight transfer that was not observed in the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) only arc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWelding Journal (Miami, Fla)
Volume89
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Fingerprint

Laser beam welding
Steel
Electric arc welding
Lasers
Welds
Fusion reactions
Welding
Metals
Free flight
Gas metal arc welding
Microstructure
High power lasers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Roepke, C., Liu, S., Kelly, S., & Martukanitz, R. (2010). Hybrid laser arc welding process evaluation on DH36 and EH36 steel. Welding Journal (Miami, Fla), 89(7).
Roepke, C. ; Liu, S. ; Kelly, S. ; Martukanitz, Richard. / Hybrid laser arc welding process evaluation on DH36 and EH36 steel. In: Welding Journal (Miami, Fla). 2010 ; Vol. 89, No. 7.
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Roepke, C, Liu, S, Kelly, S & Martukanitz, R 2010, 'Hybrid laser arc welding process evaluation on DH36 and EH36 steel', Welding Journal (Miami, Fla), vol. 89, no. 7.

Hybrid laser arc welding process evaluation on DH36 and EH36 steel. / Roepke, C.; Liu, S.; Kelly, S.; Martukanitz, Richard.

In: Welding Journal (Miami, Fla), Vol. 89, No. 7, 01.07.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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