Hyponatremia in intracranial disease: Perhaps not the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH)

P. B. Nelson, S. M. Seif, J. C. Maroon, A. G. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with intracranial disorders are prone to develop hyponatremia with inability to prevent the loss of sodium in their urine. This was originally referred to as 'cerebral salt wasting', but more recently is thought to be secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Blood volume determinations were made in 12 unselected neurosurgical patients with intracranial disease who fulfilled the laboratory criteria for SIADH. Ten of the 12 patients had significant decreases in their red blood cell mass, plasma volume, and total blood volume. The finding of a decreased blood volume in patients who fulfill the laboratory criteria for SIADH is better explained by the original concepts of cerebral salt wasting than by SIADH. The primary defect may be the inability of the kidney to conserve sodium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)938-941
Number of pages4
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

Fingerprint

Inappropriate ADH Syndrome
Hyponatremia
Vasopressins
Blood Volume
Blood Volume Determination
Salts
Sodium
Erythrocyte Volume
Plasma Volume
Erythrocytes
Urine
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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Hyponatremia in intracranial disease : Perhaps not the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). / Nelson, P. B.; Seif, S. M.; Maroon, J. C.; Robinson, A. G.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 55, No. 6, 01.01.1981, p. 938-941.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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