"i don't have to know why it snows, i just have to shovel it!": Addiction recovery, genetic frameworks, and biological citizenship

Molly J. Dingel, Jenny Ostergren, Kathleen Heaney, Barbara A. Koenig, Jennifer McCormick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gene has infiltrated the way citizens perceive themselves and their health. However, there is scant research that explores the ways genetic conceptions infiltrate individuals' understanding of their own health as it relates to a behavioral trait such as addiction. Do people seeking treatment for addiction ground their self-perception in biology in a way that shapes their experiences? We interviewed 63 participants in addiction treatment programs, asking how they make meaning of a genetic understanding of addiction in the context of their recovery, and in dealing with the stigma of addiction. About two-thirds of people in our sample did not find a genetic conception of addiction personally useful to them in treatment, instead believing that the cause was irrelevant to their daily struggle to remain abstinent. One-third of respondents believed that an individualized confirmation of a genetic predisposition to addiction would facilitate their dealing with feelings of shame and accept treatment. The vast majority of our sample believed that a genetic understanding of addiction would reduce the stigma associated with addiction, which demonstrates the perceived power of genetic explanations in U.S. society. Our results indicate that respondents (unevenly) ground their self-perception of themselves as an addicted individual in biology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-587
Number of pages20
JournalBioSocieties
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Snow
Self Concept
addiction
citizenship
Shame
Health
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Emotions
Research
Genes
self-image
biology
Surveys and Questionnaires
shame
health
citizen
Power (Psychology)
cause

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Dingel, Molly J. ; Ostergren, Jenny ; Heaney, Kathleen ; Koenig, Barbara A. ; McCormick, Jennifer. / "i don't have to know why it snows, i just have to shovel it!" : Addiction recovery, genetic frameworks, and biological citizenship. In: BioSocieties. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 568-587.
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"i don't have to know why it snows, i just have to shovel it!" : Addiction recovery, genetic frameworks, and biological citizenship. / Dingel, Molly J.; Ostergren, Jenny; Heaney, Kathleen; Koenig, Barbara A.; McCormick, Jennifer.

In: BioSocieties, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.12.2017, p. 568-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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