“I Want to Help” versus “I Am Just Mad”: How Affective Commitment Influences Customer Feedback Decisions

Stephanie Qing Liu, Anna S. Mattila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigates the joint effects of affective commitment, feedback valence, and feedback use on customers’ willingness to give feedback following a service failure. Our findings reveal that customers who have high levels of affective commitment to a service firm exhibit both a strong motivation to help a firm improve its business and a great need to maintain positive relationships with the firm’s frontline employees. Therefore, affectively committed customers are more willing to help the firm by lodging complaints when such feedback is not used for employee evaluation purposes. In addition, driven by their strong motivation to help the firm, affectively committed customers are more willing to offer constructive suggestions than their counterparts with low levels of emotional attachment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-222
Number of pages10
JournalCornell Hospitality Quarterly
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '“I Want to Help” versus “I Am Just Mad”: How Affective Commitment Influences Customer Feedback Decisions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this