Identification of an intermediate in hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA formation and sensitive and selective CCC DNA detection

Jun Luo, Xiuji Cui, Lu Gao, Jianming Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA functions as the only viral template capable of coding for all the viral RNA species and is thus essential to initiate and sustain viral replication. CCC DNA is converted, in a multistep and ill-understood process, from a relaxed circular (RC) DNA, in which neither of the two DNA strands is covalently closed. To detect putative intermediates during RC DNA to CCC DNA conversion, two 3' exonucleases, exonuclease I (Exo I) and Exo III, were used in combination to degrade all DNA strands with a free 3' end, which would nevertheless preserve closed circular DNA in either single-stranded (SS) or double-stranded (DS) form. Indeed, an RC DNA species with a covalently closed minus strand but an open plus strand (closed minus-strand RC DNA [cM-RC DNA]) was detected by this approach. Further analyses indicated that at least some of the plus strands in such a putative intermediate likely still retained the RNA primer that is attached to the 5' end of the plus strand in RC DNA, suggesting that minus-strand closing can occur before plus-strand processing. Furthermore, the same nuclease treatment proved to be useful for sensitive and specific detection of CCC DNA by removing all DNA species other than closed circular DNA. Application of these and similar approaches may allow the identification of additional intermediates during CCC DNA formation and facilitate specific and sensitive detection of CCC DNA, which should help elucidate the pathways of CCC DNA formation and the factors involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00539-17
JournalJournal of virology
Volume91
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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circular DNA
Circular DNA
Hepatitis B virus
spleen exonuclease
DNA
RNA
nucleases
Viral RNA
virus replication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

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title = "Identification of an intermediate in hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA formation and sensitive and selective CCC DNA detection",
abstract = "Hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA functions as the only viral template capable of coding for all the viral RNA species and is thus essential to initiate and sustain viral replication. CCC DNA is converted, in a multistep and ill-understood process, from a relaxed circular (RC) DNA, in which neither of the two DNA strands is covalently closed. To detect putative intermediates during RC DNA to CCC DNA conversion, two 3' exonucleases, exonuclease I (Exo I) and Exo III, were used in combination to degrade all DNA strands with a free 3' end, which would nevertheless preserve closed circular DNA in either single-stranded (SS) or double-stranded (DS) form. Indeed, an RC DNA species with a covalently closed minus strand but an open plus strand (closed minus-strand RC DNA [cM-RC DNA]) was detected by this approach. Further analyses indicated that at least some of the plus strands in such a putative intermediate likely still retained the RNA primer that is attached to the 5' end of the plus strand in RC DNA, suggesting that minus-strand closing can occur before plus-strand processing. Furthermore, the same nuclease treatment proved to be useful for sensitive and specific detection of CCC DNA by removing all DNA species other than closed circular DNA. Application of these and similar approaches may allow the identification of additional intermediates during CCC DNA formation and facilitate specific and sensitive detection of CCC DNA, which should help elucidate the pathways of CCC DNA formation and the factors involved.",
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Identification of an intermediate in hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA formation and sensitive and selective CCC DNA detection. / Luo, Jun; Cui, Xiuji; Gao, Lu; Hu, Jianming.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 91, No. 17, e00539-17, 01.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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