Identification of the first fungal annexin: Analysis of annexin gene duplications and implications for eukaryotic evolution

Edward L. Braun, Seogchan Kang, Mary Anne Nelson, Donald O. Natvig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Annexin homologues have been found in animals, plants, and distinct protist lineages. We report the identification of the first fungal annexin, encoded by the anxI4 gene of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa. Annexins have a complex evolutionary history and exhibit a large number of gene duplications and gene losses in various taxa, including the complete loss of annexin sequences from another ascomycete, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, the N. crassa annexin homologue is most closely related to the annexin homologue of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, suggesting a phylogenetic link between cellular slime molds and true fungi. Both of these annexin homologues are closely related to the family of annexin homologues present in animals, an observation consistent with the existence of the animal-fungal clade. These data further suggest that the gene duplications that generated the family of annexin sequences present in animals, fungi, and slime molds began prior to the divergence of these taxa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-543
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Molecular Evolution
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 1998

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Annexins
Gene Duplication
slime mould
gene duplication
Genes
Neurospora crassa
gene
animal
Ascomycota
molds (fungi)
animals
fungus
Animals
Dictyosteliida
Fungi
Dictyostelium discoideum
fungi
protist
yeast
Saccharomyces cerevisiae

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

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abstract = "Annexin homologues have been found in animals, plants, and distinct protist lineages. We report the identification of the first fungal annexin, encoded by the anxI4 gene of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa. Annexins have a complex evolutionary history and exhibit a large number of gene duplications and gene losses in various taxa, including the complete loss of annexin sequences from another ascomycete, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, the N. crassa annexin homologue is most closely related to the annexin homologue of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, suggesting a phylogenetic link between cellular slime molds and true fungi. Both of these annexin homologues are closely related to the family of annexin homologues present in animals, an observation consistent with the existence of the animal-fungal clade. These data further suggest that the gene duplications that generated the family of annexin sequences present in animals, fungi, and slime molds began prior to the divergence of these taxa.",
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Identification of the first fungal annexin : Analysis of annexin gene duplications and implications for eukaryotic evolution. / Braun, Edward L.; Kang, Seogchan; Nelson, Mary Anne; Natvig, Donald O.

In: Journal of Molecular Evolution, Vol. 47, No. 5, 17.11.1998, p. 531-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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