Identifying defects responsible for leakage currents in thin dielectric films

Ryan J. Waskiewicz, Elias B. Frantz, Patrick M. Lenahan, Sean W. King, Nicholas J. Harmon, Michael E. Flatte

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Leakage currents in dielectric thin films are important reliability concerns. We show that two techniques are sensitive to and can probe structural information about the atomic scale defect centers that are responsible for leakage currents in technologically important thin films. We investigate leakage currents in a-SiN:H thin films with both electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (NZFMR). In all measurements, the linewidth of the EDMR/NZFMR response is a function of the N/Si ratio of the film; the width provides information about the leakage defect structure. The NZFMR measurement provides the possibility of combining the sensitivity and at least some of the analytical power of EDMR with the simplicity of an apparatus that could potentially be implemented during fabrication of devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2018 IEEE International Integrated Reliability Workshop, IIRW 2018
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781538660393
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018
Event2018 IEEE International Integrated Reliability Workshop, IIRW 2018 - South Lake Tahoe, United States
Duration: Oct 7 2018Oct 11 2018

Publication series

NameIEEE International Integrated Reliability Workshop Final Report
Volume2018-October

Conference

Conference2018 IEEE International Integrated Reliability Workshop, IIRW 2018
CountryUnited States
CitySouth Lake Tahoe
Period10/7/1810/11/18

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Identifying defects responsible for leakage currents in thin dielectric films'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this