Identifying end-user requirements for communication systems in disadvantaged environments

Jessica Menold, Lydia Weizler, Yan Liu, Sven G. Bilen, Scarlett Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Communication and information exchange are critical for effective response to emergencies and disasters. However, most existing communication solutions lack flexibility and are not robust enough in disconnected, interrupted, or remote communication environments. Traditional communication tools fail to meet the increasingly complex needs of both public safety and private industry workers during emergency response. The Department of Homeland Security has sponsored the Pennsylvania State University and MIT Lincoln Laboratory to develop and prototype a new communication solution to operate in these disadvantaged environments, defined herein as emergency instances in which cellular or other typical modes of communication are down. Previous research has explored the communication methods and the dynamics of information exchange on first response teams. This work focuses on comparing the needs of alternative users, defined as non-first response organizations such as the American Red Cross, with the needs of the previously studied user group (first response teams). Survey responses and interviews enabled the exploration of current practices, with an emphasis on identifying the differences and similarities amongst the various user groups. Low-fidelity and medium-fidelity prototypes were created based on the interview and survey responses and were field-tested in order to gather user feedback. Design recommendations emphasizing day-to-day use were then developed and assessed by the user groups. These recommendations tailor the communication interfaces to better meet the needs of a variety of users resulting in more efficient and effective emergency response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages284-291
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781467365611
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2015
Event5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Oct 8 2015Oct 11 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015

Other

Other5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period10/8/1510/11/15

Fingerprint

Vulnerable Populations
communication system
Communication systems
Communication
communication
Emergencies
information exchange
Interviews
Red Cross
communications system
National security
Group
Disasters
interview
Homelands
disaster
Industry
flexibility
Organizations
safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Development
  • Education

Cite this

Menold, J., Weizler, L., Liu, Y., Bilen, S. G., & Miller, S. (2015). Identifying end-user requirements for communication systems in disadvantaged environments. In Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015 (pp. 284-291). [7343986] (Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2015.7343986
Menold, Jessica ; Weizler, Lydia ; Liu, Yan ; Bilen, Sven G. ; Miller, Scarlett. / Identifying end-user requirements for communication systems in disadvantaged environments. Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. pp. 284-291 (Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015).
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Menold, J, Weizler, L, Liu, Y, Bilen, SG & Miller, S 2015, Identifying end-user requirements for communication systems in disadvantaged environments. in Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015., 7343986, Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 284-291, 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015, Seattle, United States, 10/8/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2015.7343986

Identifying end-user requirements for communication systems in disadvantaged environments. / Menold, Jessica; Weizler, Lydia; Liu, Yan; Bilen, Sven G.; Miller, Scarlett.

Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. p. 284-291 7343986 (Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Menold J, Weizler L, Liu Y, Bilen SG, Miller S. Identifying end-user requirements for communication systems in disadvantaged environments. In Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2015. p. 284-291. 7343986. (Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015). https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2015.7343986