Identifying locations and directions on field and representational mapping tasks: Predictors of success

Lynn S. Liben, Lauren J. Myers, Adam E. Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Performance on field and representational mapping tasks was examined in relation to spatial skills, self-reported wayfinding skills, and participant sex. In field tasks, participants marked their locations and orientations on maps and pointed toward buildings marked on the map. In representational tasks, participants linked maps to photographed scenes and videotaped walks. Collectively, spatial tests predicted performance on all mapping tasks; tests adding unique prediction differed across tasks. Self-reported wayfinding skills predicted success on field but not representational mapping tasks. Findings show the value of research with both field and representational mapping tasks and the need to include directional information on You-Are-Here maps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-134
Number of pages30
JournalSpatial Cognition and Computation
Volume10
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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