Identifying Source Populations and Genetic Structure for Savannah Elephants in Human-Dominated Landscapes and Protected Areas in the Kenya-Tanzania Borderlands

Marissa A. Ahlering, Lori S. Eggert, David Western, Anna Bond Estes, Linus Munishi, Robert Fleischer, Melissa Roberts, Jesus E. Maldonado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the genetic metapopulation structure of elephants across the trans Rift Valley region of Kenya and Tanzania, one of the remaining strongholds for savannah elephants (Loxodonata africana) in East Africa, using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers. We then examined this population structure to determine the source population for a recent colonization event of savannah elephants on community-owned land within the trans rift valley region. Four of the five sampled populations showed significant genetic differentiation (p<0.05) as measured with both mtDNA haplotypes and microsatellites. Only the samples from the adjacent Maasai Mara and Serengeti ecosystems showed no significant differentiation. A phylogenetic neighbour-joining tree constructed from mtDNA haplotypes detected four clades. Clade four corresponds to the F clade of previous mtDNA studies that reported to have originated in forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) but to also be present in some savannah elephant populations. The split between clade four and the other three clades corresponded strongly to the geographic distribution of mtDNA haplotypes across the rift valley in the study area. Clade four was the dominant clade detected on the west side of the rift valley with rare occurrences on the east side. Finally, the strong patterns of population differentiation clearly indicated that the recent colonists to the community-owned land in Kenya came from the west side of the rift valley. Our results indicate strong female philopatry within the isolated populations of the trans rift valley region, with gene flow primarily mediated via male movements. The recent colonization event from Maasai Mara or Serengeti suggests there is hope for maintaining connectivity and population viability outside formal protected areas in the region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere52288
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 29 2012

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Tanzania
Genetic Structures
Kenya
Population Genetics
Elephantidae
Mitochondrial DNA
savannas
conservation areas
valleys
mitochondrial DNA
Population
haplotypes
Haplotypes
Microsatellite Repeats
Loxodonta
microsatellite repeats
Joining
Ecosystems
Eastern Africa
philopatry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Ahlering, Marissa A. ; Eggert, Lori S. ; Western, David ; Estes, Anna Bond ; Munishi, Linus ; Fleischer, Robert ; Roberts, Melissa ; Maldonado, Jesus E. / Identifying Source Populations and Genetic Structure for Savannah Elephants in Human-Dominated Landscapes and Protected Areas in the Kenya-Tanzania Borderlands. In: PloS one. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 12.
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Identifying Source Populations and Genetic Structure for Savannah Elephants in Human-Dominated Landscapes and Protected Areas in the Kenya-Tanzania Borderlands. / Ahlering, Marissa A.; Eggert, Lori S.; Western, David; Estes, Anna Bond; Munishi, Linus; Fleischer, Robert; Roberts, Melissa; Maldonado, Jesus E.

In: PloS one, Vol. 7, No. 12, e52288, 29.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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