Identifying users of traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas: An association rule learning approach

Allison E. Doub, Meg L. Small, Aron Levin, Kristie LeVangie, Timothy R. Brick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing home cooking while decreasing the consumption of food prepared away from home is a commonly recommended weight management strategy, however research on where individuals obtain ideas about meals to cook at home is limited. This study examined the characteristics of individuals who reported using traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas. 583 participants who were ≥50% responsible for household meal planning were recruited to approximate the 2014 United States Census distribution on sex, age, race/ethnicity, and household income. Participants reported demographic characteristics, home cooking frequency, and their use of 4 traditional resources for meal ideas (e.g., cookbooks), and 7 Internet-based resources for meal ideas (e.g., Pinterest) in an online survey. Independent samples t-tests compared home cooking frequency by resource use. Association rule learning identified those demographic characteristics that were significantly associated with resource use. Family and friends (71%), food community websites (45%), and cookbooks (41%) were the most common resources reported. Cookbook users reported preparing more meals at home per week (M = 9.65, SD = 5.28) compared to non-cookbook users (M = 8.11, SD = 4.93; t = -3.55, p < 0.001). Resource use was generally higher among parents and varied systematically with demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that home cooking interventions may benefit by modifying resources used by their target population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-136
Number of pages9
JournalAppetite
Volume103
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Association Learning
Internet
Meals
Cooking
Demography
Food
Sex Distribution
Health Services Needs and Demand
Censuses
Parents
Weights and Measures
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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abstract = "Increasing home cooking while decreasing the consumption of food prepared away from home is a commonly recommended weight management strategy, however research on where individuals obtain ideas about meals to cook at home is limited. This study examined the characteristics of individuals who reported using traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas. 583 participants who were ≥50{\%} responsible for household meal planning were recruited to approximate the 2014 United States Census distribution on sex, age, race/ethnicity, and household income. Participants reported demographic characteristics, home cooking frequency, and their use of 4 traditional resources for meal ideas (e.g., cookbooks), and 7 Internet-based resources for meal ideas (e.g., Pinterest) in an online survey. Independent samples t-tests compared home cooking frequency by resource use. Association rule learning identified those demographic characteristics that were significantly associated with resource use. Family and friends (71{\%}), food community websites (45{\%}), and cookbooks (41{\%}) were the most common resources reported. Cookbook users reported preparing more meals at home per week (M = 9.65, SD = 5.28) compared to non-cookbook users (M = 8.11, SD = 4.93; t = -3.55, p < 0.001). Resource use was generally higher among parents and varied systematically with demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that home cooking interventions may benefit by modifying resources used by their target population.",
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Identifying users of traditional and Internet-based resources for meal ideas : An association rule learning approach. / Doub, Allison E.; Small, Meg L.; Levin, Aron; LeVangie, Kristie; Brick, Timothy R.

In: Appetite, Vol. 103, 01.08.2016, p. 128-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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