Identity representations in patterns of school achievement and well-being among early adolescent girls: Variable- and person-centered approaches

Robert W. Roeser, Mollie Galloway, Shannon Casey-Cannon, Cary Watson, Laura Keller, Elyn Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines relations between early adolescent girls' well-being, achievement, and emerging identities. Variable-centered results showed that girls' moral and student identities were the strongest predictors of their achievement, whereas their moral, student, physical, and peer identities predicted their well-being. Person-centered results delineated four subgroups of girls based on their profiles of well being and achievement. The largest group of girls (46%) was characterized by well being and positive school achievement and had balanced adult- and peer-oriented identities. The second largest group (35%), characterized by emotional distress and average school achievement, had positive student and negative physical and peer identity representations. The third group (12%), characterized by emotional distress and poor school achievement, reported pervasive negative representations. The final group (7%), characterized by well being and poor achievement, did not consider themselves good students but did see themselves as physically attractive. Interviews revealed identity challenges characteristic of girls in each subgroup.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-152
Number of pages38
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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well-being
adolescent
human being
school
Students
Group
student
Child Welfare
Interviews
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Roeser, Robert W. ; Galloway, Mollie ; Casey-Cannon, Shannon ; Watson, Cary ; Keller, Laura ; Tan, Elyn. / Identity representations in patterns of school achievement and well-being among early adolescent girls : Variable- and person-centered approaches. In: Journal of Early Adolescence. 2008 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 115-152.
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Identity representations in patterns of school achievement and well-being among early adolescent girls : Variable- and person-centered approaches. / Roeser, Robert W.; Galloway, Mollie; Casey-Cannon, Shannon; Watson, Cary; Keller, Laura; Tan, Elyn.

In: Journal of Early Adolescence, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.02.2008, p. 115-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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