Immigration effects on homicide offending for total and race/ethnicity-disaggregated populations (White, Black, and Latino)

Ben Feldmeyer, Darrell Steffensmeier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sociological studies of crime have rarely examined the effects of immigration on aggregate patterns of violent offending, and particularly few studies have examined this relationship across multiple racial/ethnic populations. The current study extends research on immigration and crime by examining this relationship across total and race/ ethnicity-disaggregated populations (i.e., White, Black, and Latino) and for homicide offending (rather than homicide victimization) using 1999-2001 arrest data drawn from 328 census places in California. Findings reveal that immigrant concentration has trivial (nonsignificant) effects on overall homicides and Latino homicides, but slightly reduces White and Black homicide offending, net of controls. Implications of these findings are as follows: (a) Immigration does not have violence-generating effects but instead appears to have violence-neutral or perhaps some violence-reducing effects on homicide offending, and (b) This small or null effect is fairly consistent across racial/ ethnic populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-226
Number of pages16
JournalHomicide Studies
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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