Immunology of acne

Galen Foulke, Amanda Nelson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Activation of the immune system is a central event in the development of acne, and our understanding of this process is rapidly expanding. In this chapter, we describe how P. acnes, sebaceous glands, and keratinocytes contribute to inflammation in acne and how current acne treatments modulate this immune response. Specifically, we address the role of anti-microbial peptides, Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), sebaceous lipids as well as cytokines and the role of the inflammasome as driving inflammation in acne. The anti-inflammatory activities of retinoids, tetracyclines and other therapies are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClinical and Basic Immunodermatology
Subtitle of host publicationSecond Edition
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages431-438
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9783319297859
ISBN (Print)9783319297835
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 24 2017

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Acne Vulgaris
Allergy and Immunology
Inflammasomes
Inflammation
Sebaceous Glands
Tetracyclines
Toll-Like Receptors
Retinoids
Keratinocytes
Immune System
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Cytokines
Lipids
Peptides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Foulke, G., & Nelson, A. (2017). Immunology of acne. In Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition (pp. 431-438). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29785-9_24
Foulke, Galen ; Nelson, Amanda. / Immunology of acne. Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing, 2017. pp. 431-438
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Foulke, G & Nelson, A 2017, Immunology of acne. in Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing, pp. 431-438. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29785-9_24

Immunology of acne. / Foulke, Galen; Nelson, Amanda.

Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing, 2017. p. 431-438.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Foulke G, Nelson A. Immunology of acne. In Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing. 2017. p. 431-438 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29785-9_24