Impact mechanics parametric studies with applications to dynamic force calibration

Nicholas Vlajic, Ako Chijioke

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

National Measurement Institutions have developed apparatuses that rely on impacting bodies to realize time-varying forces for dynamic calibration of force transducers. Within this manuscript, we present a reduced-order model to investigate the effects of structural and contact parameters on determining the frequency-dependent calibration function of the force transducer that is to be calibrated. The reduced-order model is validated with experimental measurements and is used to conduct parametric studies, wherein regions of single impact events and contact time are mapped out in parameter space. Although this study has been conducted with dynamic force calibrations in mind, the results presented here are of broader relevance to modal analysis and system identification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication13th International Conference on Multibody Systems, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Control
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791858202
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
EventASME 2017 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2017 - Cleveland, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2017Aug 9 2017

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume6

Other

OtherASME 2017 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityCleveland
Period8/6/178/9/17

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

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