Impact of a “No Mobile Device” Policy on Developmental Surveillance in a Pediatric Clinic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children commonly use mobile devices at pediatric office visits. This practice may affect patient-provider interaction and undermine accuracy of developmental surveillance. A randomized, provider-blinded, controlled trial examined whether a policy prohibiting mobile device use in a pediatric clinic improved accuracy of pediatricians’ developmental surveillance. Children, aged 18 to 36 months, were randomized to device-prohibited (intervention; n = 58) or device-allowed (control; n = 54) groups. After a 30-minute well-visit, development was evaluated as “normal,” “borderline,” or “delayed” in 5 categories using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3). ASQ-3 results were compared with providers’ clinical assessment in each category. Provider-ASQ discrepancies were more common for intervention participants (P =.025). Providers “missed” more ASQ-3 “delayed” scores (P =.005) in the intervention group, particularly in the fine motor domain (P =.018). Prohibiting mobile device use at well-visits did not improve accuracy of providers’ developmental surveillance. Mobile devices may entertain children at well-visits, allowing opportunities for parent-provider discussion, or observation of fine motor skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1216-1223
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume57
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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Pediatrics
Equipment and Supplies
Office Visits
Motor Skills
Observation
Haemophilus influenzae type b-polysaccharide vaccine-diphtheria toxoid conjugate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Children commonly use mobile devices at pediatric office visits. This practice may affect patient-provider interaction and undermine accuracy of developmental surveillance. A randomized, provider-blinded, controlled trial examined whether a policy prohibiting mobile device use in a pediatric clinic improved accuracy of pediatricians’ developmental surveillance. Children, aged 18 to 36 months, were randomized to device-prohibited (intervention; n = 58) or device-allowed (control; n = 54) groups. After a 30-minute well-visit, development was evaluated as “normal,” “borderline,” or “delayed” in 5 categories using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3). ASQ-3 results were compared with providers’ clinical assessment in each category. Provider-ASQ discrepancies were more common for intervention participants (P =.025). Providers “missed” more ASQ-3 “delayed” scores (P =.005) in the intervention group, particularly in the fine motor domain (P =.018). Prohibiting mobile device use at well-visits did not improve accuracy of providers’ developmental surveillance. Mobile devices may entertain children at well-visits, allowing opportunities for parent-provider discussion, or observation of fine motor skills.",
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Impact of a “No Mobile Device” Policy on Developmental Surveillance in a Pediatric Clinic. / Regan, Paul A.; Fogel, Benjamin; Hicks, Steven.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 57, No. 10, 01.09.2018, p. 1216-1223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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