Impact of assimilation window length on diurnal features in a Mars atmospheric analysis

Yongjing Zhao, Steven J. Greybush, R. John Wilson, Ross N. Hoffman, Eugenia Kalnay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Effective simulation of diurnal variability is an important aspect of many geophysical data assimilation systems. For the Martian atmosphere, thermal tides are particularly prominent and contribute much to the Martian atmospheric circulation, dynamics and dust transport. To study the Mars diurnal variability and Mars thermal tides, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Mars Global Climate Model with the 4D-local ensemble transform Kalman filter (4D-LETKF) is used to perform an analysis assimilating spacecraft temperature retrievals. We find that the use of a 'traditional' 6-hr assimilation cycle induces spurious forcing of a resonantly enhanced semi-diurnal Kelvin waves represented in both surface pressure and mid-level temperature by forming a wave 4 pattern in the diurnal averaged analysis increment that acts as a 'topographic' stationary forcing. Different assimilation window lengths in the 4D-LETKF are introduced to remove the artificially induced resonance. It is found that short assimilation window lengths not only remove the spurious resonance, but also push the migrating semi-diurnal temperature variation at 50 Pa closer to the estimated 'true' tides even in the absence of a radiatively active water ice cloud parameterisation. In order to compare the performance of different assimilation window lengths, short-term to mid-range forecasts based on the hour 00 and 12 assimilation are evaluated and compared. Results show that during Northern Hemisphere summer, it is not the assimilation window length, but the radiatively active water ice clouds that influence the model prediction. A 'diurnal bias correction' that includes bias correction fields dependent on the local time is shown to effectively reduce the forecast root mean square differences between forecasts and observations, compensate for the absence of water ice cloud parameterisation and enhance Martian atmosphere prediction. The implications of these results for data assimilation in the Earth's atmosphere are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalTellus, Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oceanography
  • Atmospheric Science

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