Impact of environmental design features: Does color scheme influence transputed attributions?

Sae Lynne Schatz, Clint A. Bowers, Heather C. Lum

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Businesses invest millions in their environmental designs, hoping that they will communicate "the right" message and influence consumers' perceptions and behaviors. This investment is based on a set of beliefs that are widely held in the design community; however, there has been little attempt to validate them. As a first effort towards validation, we conducted a two-part study. We examined designers' beliefs about the impact of room color, in general, and evaluated the specific anecdotal principle that deep, red hues appear expensive. The results suggest that beliefs regarding the behavioral affects of color are quite prevalent. For the second part of the study, we created three illustrations of a restaurant, each featuring various shades of red. Sixty-two participants rated their opinions of the restaurants. The results suggest that a discrepancy exists between designers' beliefs and the public's reactions. We recommend the use of attribution theory and policy-capturing to resolve this.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005
Pages841-845
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2005
Event49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Sep 26 2005Sep 30 2005

Other

Other49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period9/26/059/30/05

Fingerprint

Color
Industry
Environmental design

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Schatz, S. L., Bowers, C. A., & Lum, H. C. (2005). Impact of environmental design features: Does color scheme influence transputed attributions? In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005 (pp. 841-845)
Schatz, Sae Lynne ; Bowers, Clint A. ; Lum, Heather C. / Impact of environmental design features : Does color scheme influence transputed attributions?. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005. 2005. pp. 841-845
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Schatz, SL, Bowers, CA & Lum, HC 2005, Impact of environmental design features: Does color scheme influence transputed attributions? in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005. pp. 841-845, 49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005, Orlando, FL, United States, 9/26/05.

Impact of environmental design features : Does color scheme influence transputed attributions? / Schatz, Sae Lynne; Bowers, Clint A.; Lum, Heather C.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005. 2005. p. 841-845.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Schatz SL, Bowers CA, Lum HC. Impact of environmental design features: Does color scheme influence transputed attributions? In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005. 2005. p. 841-845