Impact of perceptions of faculty on student outcomes of self-efficacy, locus of control, persistence, and commitment

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The literature on higher education supports the assumption that the integration of environmental and psychological factors are critical in influencing the intents of students to stay in college. Yet, questions exist on the impact faculty may have on student retention. This exploratory study examines perceptions of students about faculty in terms of relatedness, responsiveness, teaching quality, and treatment of students and how those perceptions impact students' own perceptions of their self-efficacy, locus of control, persistence, and commitment. Results yielded positive and significant correlations. Respondents identified specific attributes of faculty which could potentially enhance or frustrate their intentions to stay in college. Recommendations for promoting quality faculty-student interactions in and out of the classroom and the ethics of caring are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-309
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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locus of control
self-efficacy
persistence
commitment
student
psychological factors
environmental factors
moral philosophy
classroom
Teaching
interaction
education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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