Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

Peng Ye, Chenxi Sun, Magin Lapuerta, John Agudelo, Randy Vander Wal, Andre L. Boehman, Todd J. Toops, Stuart Daw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An investigation of the impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on exhaust particulate agglomerate morphology and primary particle (soot) nanostructure was conducted with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium-high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. The fuels used were ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with transmission electronic microscopy imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with both rail pressure and biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to an increase in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but had no impact on nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-208
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Engine Research
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Fueling
Direct injection
Soot
Biodiesel
Diesel engines
Rails
Nanostructures
Particle size
Dynamometers
Fuel injection
X ray diffraction analysis
Raman spectroscopy
Thermogravimetric analysis
Esters
Microscopic examination
Sulfur
Engines
Scanning
Imaging techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Ye, Peng ; Sun, Chenxi ; Lapuerta, Magin ; Agudelo, John ; Vander Wal, Randy ; Boehman, Andre L. ; Toops, Todd J. ; Daw, Stuart. / Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. In: International Journal of Engine Research. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 193-208.
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Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. / Ye, Peng; Sun, Chenxi; Lapuerta, Magin; Agudelo, John; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; Toops, Todd J.; Daw, Stuart.

In: International Journal of Engine Research, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 193-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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