Impact of the pediatric tonsillectomy and polysomnography clinical practice guidelines

Dhave Setabutr, Eelam A. Adil, Irina Chaikhoutdinov, Michele M. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of the recently published guidelines on Tonsillectomy in Children and Polysomnography for Sleep-Disordered Breathing Prior to Tonsillectomy in Children on physician practice patterns. Study design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Survey of members of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Setting: Academic tertiary referral center. Results: A total of 280 physicians completed the survey, with a response rate of 41.7%. 93% of respondents had read the clinical practice guidelines. Many respondents had completed a pediatric otolaryngology fellowship (46%). A large group of physicians (46%) continue to prescribe antibiotics within 24. h after surgery. One-third of respondents stopped prescribing antibiotics because of the guidelines. Discord between severity of symptoms and tonsil size was the most common reason cited for ordering a polysomnogram prior to tonsillectomy (76%). The most common reason cited for admission post-tonsillectomy was age less than 3 (40%). Less than half of physicians prescribe NSAIDs for pain control (43.8%) despite its safety profile, and only 23% reported that the guidelines influenced their use of NSAIDs postoperatively. Most respondents use intra-operative steroids (90%) as recommended. Conclusion: The guidelines are intended to provide evidence based direction in tonsillectomy practices and improve referral patterns for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy. The majority of the surveyed otolaryngologists reviewed these guidelines and some have changed their practice secondary to the guidelines. However, many physicians continue to prescribe post-operative antibiotics and do not use NSAIDs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-521
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

Fingerprint

Tonsillectomy
Polysomnography
Practice Guidelines
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Physicians
Otolaryngology
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Physicians' Practice Patterns
Palatine Tonsil
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Tertiary Care Centers
Surveys and Questionnaires
Neck
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Steroids
Head
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Setabutr, Dhave ; Adil, Eelam A. ; Chaikhoutdinov, Irina ; Carr, Michele M. / Impact of the pediatric tonsillectomy and polysomnography clinical practice guidelines. In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 2014 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 517-521.
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Impact of the pediatric tonsillectomy and polysomnography clinical practice guidelines. / Setabutr, Dhave; Adil, Eelam A.; Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Carr, Michele M.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 78, No. 3, 01.03.2014, p. 517-521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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