Impact of the use of techniques and situation awareness on pilots' procedure compliance

Steven J. Landry, Julie A. Jacko

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In two empirical studies using desktop flight simulators, pilots were monitored while following procedures. In both experiments, pilots demonstrated a high degree of reliance on rule-based heuristics for following procedures (techniques), rather than on the procedures themselves. This was true regardless of the resulting compliance with the procedure. Changes to the procedure and changes to the content of displayed information had no effect on the use of techniques. In addition, frequent instances of noncompliance to procedure were recorded. The most common types of noncompliance, technical failures in implementing the procedure, were found to be nearly all innocuous, while failures related to a lack of situation awareness comprised the bulk of unsafe instances of noncompliance. Also found were a number of instances of noncompliance which actually enhanced the safety of the procedure. The results have implications for the design of procedures and for automated aids for procedure following.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006
Pages40-44
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2006
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2006Oct 20 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period10/16/0610/20/06

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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