Impacts of supplemental feeding on survival rates of black-capped chickadees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parus atricapillus with access to supplemental food had higher average monthly survival rates (95 vs. 87%), higher over-winter survival rates (69 vs. 37%), and higher standardized body masses (an additional 0.13 g) than birds on control sites. Differential survival occurred primarily during months with severe weather (>5 d below -18oC). During these months, high energy demands probably made it difficult for birds without access to supplemental food to obtain sufficient energy from dispersed natural sources. Also, during periods of extreme weather when foraging may be difficult, the extra fat carried by individuals that are supplementally fed may increase the probability of survival. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-589
Number of pages9
JournalEcology
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Poecile atricapillus
dietary supplements
weather
survival rate
birds
energy
overwintering
foraging
bird
severe weather
food
lipids
body mass
fat
rate
winter

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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Impacts of supplemental feeding on survival rates of black-capped chickadees. / Brittingham-Brant, Margaret; Temple, S. A.

In: Ecology, Vol. 69, No. 3, 01.01.1988, p. 581-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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