Impaired Retinal Vasoreactivity: An Early Marker of Stroke Risk in Diabetes

Kerstin Bettermann, Julia Slocomb, Vikram Shivkumar, David Quillen, Thomas W. Gardner, Mary E. Lott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes is a common cause of small vessel disease leading to stroke and vascular dementia. While the function and structure of large cerebral vessels can be easily studied, the brain's microvasculature remains difficult to assess. Previous studies have demonstrated that structural changes in the retinal vessel architecture predict stroke risk, but these changes occur at late disease stages. Our goal was to examine whether retinal vascular status can predict cerebral small vessel dysfunction during early stages of diabetes. Retinal vasoreactivity and cerebral vascular function were measured in 78 subjects (19 healthy controls, 22 subjects with prediabetes, and 37 with type-2 diabetes) using a new noninvasive retinal imaging device (Dynamic Vessel Analyzer) and transcranial Doppler studies, respectively. Cerebral blood vessel responsiveness worsened with disease progression of diabetes. Similarly, retinal vascular reactivity was significantly attenuated in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes compared to healthy controls. Subjects with prediabetes and diabetes with impaired cerebral vasoreactivity showed mainly attenuation of the retinal venous flicker response. This is the first study to explore the relationship between retinal and cerebral vascular function in diabetes. Impairment of venous retinal responsiveness may be one of the earliest markers of vascular dysfunction in diabetes possibly indicating subsequent risk of stroke and vascular dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-84
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroimaging
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Retinal Vessels
Prediabetic State
Stroke
Blood Vessels
Vascular Dementia
Microvessels
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Disease Progression
Healthy Volunteers
Equipment and Supplies
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Bettermann, Kerstin ; Slocomb, Julia ; Shivkumar, Vikram ; Quillen, David ; Gardner, Thomas W. ; Lott, Mary E. / Impaired Retinal Vasoreactivity : An Early Marker of Stroke Risk in Diabetes. In: Journal of Neuroimaging. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 78-84.
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Impaired Retinal Vasoreactivity : An Early Marker of Stroke Risk in Diabetes. / Bettermann, Kerstin; Slocomb, Julia; Shivkumar, Vikram; Quillen, David; Gardner, Thomas W.; Lott, Mary E.

In: Journal of Neuroimaging, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 78-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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