Impaired white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with previous brain hemorrhage

X. Ou, C. M. Glasier, R. H. Ramakrishnaiah, S. B. Mulkey, Z. Ding, T. L. Angtuaco, A. Andres, J. R. Kaiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain hemorrhage is common in premature infants. The purpose of the study is to evaluate white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with or without previous brain hemorrhage.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three extremely low-birth-weight infants were prospectively enrolled and included in this institutional review board-approved study. Another 10 healthy term infants were included as controls. The medical records of the extremely low-birth-weight infants were reviewed for sonography diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage. All infants had an MR imaging examination at term-equivalent age for detection of previous hemorrhage, and their white matter was scored and compared among different groups. DTI measured fractional anisotropy values were also compared voxelwise by tract-based spatial statistics.

RESULTS: Compared with controls, the white matter score was not significantly different in extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging (P=.17), but was significantly worse in extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis by sonography (P = .02), in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 1 or 2 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .003), and in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .0001). Extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging did not show any white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values than controls. Extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging, but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis, did show white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values, and extremely low-birth-weight infants with intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis had widespread white matter regions with lower fractional anisotropy values.

CONCLUSIONS: Previous brain hemorrhage is associated with abnormal white matter in extremely low-birth-weight infants at termequivalent age, and sonography is not sensitive to minor hemorrhages that are sufficient to cause white matter injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1983-1989
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume35
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

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Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Hemorrhage
Anisotropy
Ultrasonography
White Matter
Research Ethics Committees
Premature Infants
Medical Records

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ou, X. ; Glasier, C. M. ; Ramakrishnaiah, R. H. ; Mulkey, S. B. ; Ding, Z. ; Angtuaco, T. L. ; Andres, A. ; Kaiser, J. R. / Impaired white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with previous brain hemorrhage. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 10. pp. 1983-1989.
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title = "Impaired white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with previous brain hemorrhage",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain hemorrhage is common in premature infants. The purpose of the study is to evaluate white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with or without previous brain hemorrhage.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three extremely low-birth-weight infants were prospectively enrolled and included in this institutional review board-approved study. Another 10 healthy term infants were included as controls. The medical records of the extremely low-birth-weight infants were reviewed for sonography diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage. All infants had an MR imaging examination at term-equivalent age for detection of previous hemorrhage, and their white matter was scored and compared among different groups. DTI measured fractional anisotropy values were also compared voxelwise by tract-based spatial statistics.RESULTS: Compared with controls, the white matter score was not significantly different in extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging (P=.17), but was significantly worse in extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis by sonography (P = .02), in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 1 or 2 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .003), and in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .0001). Extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging did not show any white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values than controls. Extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging, but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis, did show white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values, and extremely low-birth-weight infants with intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis had widespread white matter regions with lower fractional anisotropy values.CONCLUSIONS: Previous brain hemorrhage is associated with abnormal white matter in extremely low-birth-weight infants at termequivalent age, and sonography is not sensitive to minor hemorrhages that are sufficient to cause white matter injury.",
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Ou, X, Glasier, CM, Ramakrishnaiah, RH, Mulkey, SB, Ding, Z, Angtuaco, TL, Andres, A & Kaiser, JR 2014, 'Impaired white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with previous brain hemorrhage', American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 35, no. 10, pp. 1983-1989. https://doi.org/10.3174/ajnr.A3988

Impaired white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with previous brain hemorrhage. / Ou, X.; Glasier, C. M.; Ramakrishnaiah, R. H.; Mulkey, S. B.; Ding, Z.; Angtuaco, T. L.; Andres, A.; Kaiser, J. R.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 35, No. 10, 01.10.2014, p. 1983-1989.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Impaired white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with previous brain hemorrhage

AU - Ou, X.

AU - Glasier, C. M.

AU - Ramakrishnaiah, R. H.

AU - Mulkey, S. B.

AU - Ding, Z.

AU - Angtuaco, T. L.

AU - Andres, A.

AU - Kaiser, J. R.

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Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain hemorrhage is common in premature infants. The purpose of the study is to evaluate white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with or without previous brain hemorrhage.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three extremely low-birth-weight infants were prospectively enrolled and included in this institutional review board-approved study. Another 10 healthy term infants were included as controls. The medical records of the extremely low-birth-weight infants were reviewed for sonography diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage. All infants had an MR imaging examination at term-equivalent age for detection of previous hemorrhage, and their white matter was scored and compared among different groups. DTI measured fractional anisotropy values were also compared voxelwise by tract-based spatial statistics.RESULTS: Compared with controls, the white matter score was not significantly different in extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging (P=.17), but was significantly worse in extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis by sonography (P = .02), in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 1 or 2 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .003), and in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .0001). Extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging did not show any white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values than controls. Extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging, but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis, did show white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values, and extremely low-birth-weight infants with intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis had widespread white matter regions with lower fractional anisotropy values.CONCLUSIONS: Previous brain hemorrhage is associated with abnormal white matter in extremely low-birth-weight infants at termequivalent age, and sonography is not sensitive to minor hemorrhages that are sufficient to cause white matter injury.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain hemorrhage is common in premature infants. The purpose of the study is to evaluate white matter development in extremely low-birth-weight infants with or without previous brain hemorrhage.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three extremely low-birth-weight infants were prospectively enrolled and included in this institutional review board-approved study. Another 10 healthy term infants were included as controls. The medical records of the extremely low-birth-weight infants were reviewed for sonography diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage. All infants had an MR imaging examination at term-equivalent age for detection of previous hemorrhage, and their white matter was scored and compared among different groups. DTI measured fractional anisotropy values were also compared voxelwise by tract-based spatial statistics.RESULTS: Compared with controls, the white matter score was not significantly different in extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging (P=.17), but was significantly worse in extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis by sonography (P = .02), in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 1 or 2 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .003), and in extremely low-birth-weight infants with grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage on sonography (P = .0001). Extremely low-birth-weight infants without blood deposition on MR imaging did not show any white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values than controls. Extremely low-birth-weight infants with blood deposition on MR imaging, but no intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis, did show white matter regions with significantly lower fractional anisotropy values, and extremely low-birth-weight infants with intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosis had widespread white matter regions with lower fractional anisotropy values.CONCLUSIONS: Previous brain hemorrhage is associated with abnormal white matter in extremely low-birth-weight infants at termequivalent age, and sonography is not sensitive to minor hemorrhages that are sufficient to cause white matter injury.

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