Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds

William D. Burgos, Hui Tan, Cara M. Santelli, Colleen M. Hansel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coal mine drainage (CMD) is a serious threat to the environment of Appalachia in the United States, releasing large volumes of acid and metal contaminants (e.g., Mn, Fe). Passive limestone-based treatment systems are the most cost-effective method for manganese(II) (Mn(II)) removal from CMD. The success of passive Mn(II)-removal systems has been variable due to a poor understanding of the mechanisms of Mn removal and the microbial communities involved. We selected one Mn-removal system from northwestern Pennsylvania that treats an exceptionally high concentration of 150 mg/L Mn(II), and conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate the relative importance of abiotic versus biotic processes responsible for Mn removal, and to evaluate the relative importance of bacteria versus fungi on biological Mn(II) oxidation. We found that while abiotic processes such as Mn(II) sorption and heterogeneous oxidation contribute to Mn removal, biological Mn(II) oxidation is the most important process to ensure effective, long-term Mn removal. We also found, that fungal activity accounted for over 80% of Mn(II) oxidation in this Mn-removal bed. We also selected four additional Mn-removal systems from western Pennsylvania for an extensive culture enrichment survey of bacteria and fungi. From this survey, we found that Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi were isolated more readily than Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria - fungal isolates outnumbered bacterial isolates 84:10 in 3 of the 4 systems, and that fungi were extremely tolerant to elevated concentrations of Mn(II).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJoint Mining Reclamation Conf. 2010 - 27th Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf.
Pages70-88
Number of pages19
Volume1
StatePublished - 2010
EventJoint Mining Reclamation Conference 2010 - 27th Annual Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Annual Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Annual Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf. - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: Jun 5 2010Jun 11 2010

Other

OtherJoint Mining Reclamation Conference 2010 - 27th Annual Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Annual Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Annual Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf.
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period6/5/106/11/10

Fingerprint

Calcium Carbonate
Manganese
Limestone
Fungi
manganese
limestone
fungus
oxidation
Oxidation
mine drainage
Bacteria
Coal mines
coal mine
Drainage
bacterium
removal
Sorption
microbial community
sorption
Metals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Burgos, W. D., Tan, H., Santelli, C. M., & Hansel, C. M. (2010). Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds. In Joint Mining Reclamation Conf. 2010 - 27th Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf. (Vol. 1, pp. 70-88)
Burgos, William D. ; Tan, Hui ; Santelli, Cara M. ; Hansel, Colleen M. / Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds. Joint Mining Reclamation Conf. 2010 - 27th Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf.. Vol. 1 2010. pp. 70-88
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title = "Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds",
abstract = "Coal mine drainage (CMD) is a serious threat to the environment of Appalachia in the United States, releasing large volumes of acid and metal contaminants (e.g., Mn, Fe). Passive limestone-based treatment systems are the most cost-effective method for manganese(II) (Mn(II)) removal from CMD. The success of passive Mn(II)-removal systems has been variable due to a poor understanding of the mechanisms of Mn removal and the microbial communities involved. We selected one Mn-removal system from northwestern Pennsylvania that treats an exceptionally high concentration of 150 mg/L Mn(II), and conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate the relative importance of abiotic versus biotic processes responsible for Mn removal, and to evaluate the relative importance of bacteria versus fungi on biological Mn(II) oxidation. We found that while abiotic processes such as Mn(II) sorption and heterogeneous oxidation contribute to Mn removal, biological Mn(II) oxidation is the most important process to ensure effective, long-term Mn removal. We also found, that fungal activity accounted for over 80{\%} of Mn(II) oxidation in this Mn-removal bed. We also selected four additional Mn-removal systems from western Pennsylvania for an extensive culture enrichment survey of bacteria and fungi. From this survey, we found that Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi were isolated more readily than Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria - fungal isolates outnumbered bacterial isolates 84:10 in 3 of the 4 systems, and that fungi were extremely tolerant to elevated concentrations of Mn(II).",
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Burgos, WD, Tan, H, Santelli, CM & Hansel, CM 2010, Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds. in Joint Mining Reclamation Conf. 2010 - 27th Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf.. vol. 1, pp. 70-88, Joint Mining Reclamation Conference 2010 - 27th Annual Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Annual Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Annual Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf., Pittsburgh, PA, United States, 6/5/10.

Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds. / Burgos, William D.; Tan, Hui; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.

Joint Mining Reclamation Conf. 2010 - 27th Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf.. Vol. 1 2010. p. 70-88.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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T1 - Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds

AU - Burgos, William D.

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N2 - Coal mine drainage (CMD) is a serious threat to the environment of Appalachia in the United States, releasing large volumes of acid and metal contaminants (e.g., Mn, Fe). Passive limestone-based treatment systems are the most cost-effective method for manganese(II) (Mn(II)) removal from CMD. The success of passive Mn(II)-removal systems has been variable due to a poor understanding of the mechanisms of Mn removal and the microbial communities involved. We selected one Mn-removal system from northwestern Pennsylvania that treats an exceptionally high concentration of 150 mg/L Mn(II), and conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate the relative importance of abiotic versus biotic processes responsible for Mn removal, and to evaluate the relative importance of bacteria versus fungi on biological Mn(II) oxidation. We found that while abiotic processes such as Mn(II) sorption and heterogeneous oxidation contribute to Mn removal, biological Mn(II) oxidation is the most important process to ensure effective, long-term Mn removal. We also found, that fungal activity accounted for over 80% of Mn(II) oxidation in this Mn-removal bed. We also selected four additional Mn-removal systems from western Pennsylvania for an extensive culture enrichment survey of bacteria and fungi. From this survey, we found that Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi were isolated more readily than Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria - fungal isolates outnumbered bacterial isolates 84:10 in 3 of the 4 systems, and that fungi were extremely tolerant to elevated concentrations of Mn(II).

AB - Coal mine drainage (CMD) is a serious threat to the environment of Appalachia in the United States, releasing large volumes of acid and metal contaminants (e.g., Mn, Fe). Passive limestone-based treatment systems are the most cost-effective method for manganese(II) (Mn(II)) removal from CMD. The success of passive Mn(II)-removal systems has been variable due to a poor understanding of the mechanisms of Mn removal and the microbial communities involved. We selected one Mn-removal system from northwestern Pennsylvania that treats an exceptionally high concentration of 150 mg/L Mn(II), and conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate the relative importance of abiotic versus biotic processes responsible for Mn removal, and to evaluate the relative importance of bacteria versus fungi on biological Mn(II) oxidation. We found that while abiotic processes such as Mn(II) sorption and heterogeneous oxidation contribute to Mn removal, biological Mn(II) oxidation is the most important process to ensure effective, long-term Mn removal. We also found, that fungal activity accounted for over 80% of Mn(II) oxidation in this Mn-removal bed. We also selected four additional Mn-removal systems from western Pennsylvania for an extensive culture enrichment survey of bacteria and fungi. From this survey, we found that Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi were isolated more readily than Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria - fungal isolates outnumbered bacterial isolates 84:10 in 3 of the 4 systems, and that fungi were extremely tolerant to elevated concentrations of Mn(II).

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M3 - Conference contribution

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Burgos WD, Tan H, Santelli CM, Hansel CM. Importance of fungi in biological MN(II) oxidation in limestone treatment beds. In Joint Mining Reclamation Conf. 2010 - 27th Meeting of the ASMR, 12th Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conf. and 4th Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative Mined Land Reforestation Conf.. Vol. 1. 2010. p. 70-88