Importance of social skills in the elementary grades

Catherine R. Meier, James Clyde Diperna, Maryjo M. Oster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored elementary teachers' perceptions of the importance of social skills, as well as the stability of these perceptions over time. Importance ratings on the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS; Gresham & Elliott, 1990) were obtained from 50 elementary teachers (Grades 1-6) across six elementary schools. Results indicated that cooperation and self-control skills were viewed as being more important than assertion skills. In addition, 11 specific social skills were identified by a majority of teacher respondents as "critical" for success in the classroom. Finally, no significant differences were observed in teachers' importance ratings between the beginning and end of the school year. Implications for prevention and early intervention services in the schools are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-419
Number of pages11
JournalEducation and Treatment of Children
Volume29
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

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school grade
rating
teacher
Time Perception
self-control
school
elementary school
classroom
Social Skills
Self-Control
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Meier, Catherine R. ; Diperna, James Clyde ; Oster, Maryjo M. / Importance of social skills in the elementary grades. In: Education and Treatment of Children. 2006 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 409-419.
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Importance of social skills in the elementary grades. / Meier, Catherine R.; Diperna, James Clyde; Oster, Maryjo M.

In: Education and Treatment of Children, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.08.2006, p. 409-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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