Improvements in risk factor control among persons with diabetes in the United States: Evidence and implications for remaining life expectancy

Thomas J. Hoerger, Ping Zhang, Joel E. Segel, Edward W. Gregg, K. M.Venkat Narayan, Katherine A. Hicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To examine whether A1c, blood pressure, and cholesterol values changed for U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes between 1988-1994 and 2005-2006. We then project the impact of these changes on life expectancy and diabetes-related complications. Methods: We estimated changes in hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, and total cholesterol between 1988-1994 and 2005-2006 using regression analysis and data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We projected the potential effects on life expectancy and complications using the CDC-RTI Diabetes Cost-Effectiveness Model. Results: A1c fell by 0.68 percentage points (P = 0.001) among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes. Among those with diabetes and hypertension, systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell by 5.66 and 8.15 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.005 and P = 0.001). Among those with diabetes and high cholesterol, total cholesterol fell by 36.41 mg/dL (P = 0.001). These improvements were projected to increase life expectancy for persons with newly diagnosed diabetes by 1.0 year. Conclusions: Risk factor control has improved in the United States. Persons newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005 have a better prognosis than persons diagnosed with diabetes 11 years earlier.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-232
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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Life Expectancy
Cholesterol
Blood Pressure
Nutrition Surveys
Diabetes Complications
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Hemoglobins
Regression Analysis
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Hoerger, Thomas J. ; Zhang, Ping ; Segel, Joel E. ; Gregg, Edward W. ; Narayan, K. M.Venkat ; Hicks, Katherine A. / Improvements in risk factor control among persons with diabetes in the United States : Evidence and implications for remaining life expectancy. In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2009 ; Vol. 86, No. 3. pp. 225-232.
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Improvements in risk factor control among persons with diabetes in the United States : Evidence and implications for remaining life expectancy. / Hoerger, Thomas J.; Zhang, Ping; Segel, Joel E.; Gregg, Edward W.; Narayan, K. M.Venkat; Hicks, Katherine A.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 86, No. 3, 01.12.2009, p. 225-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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