Improving Influenza Vaccination Rates for Children Through Year-round Scheduling

Ian Paul, Sara B. Eleoff, Michele L. Shaffer, Ryan M. Bucher, Kathleen M. Moyer, Maryellen E. Gusic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Barriers to influenza vaccination negatively impact immunization rates contributing to the morbidity and mortality from influenza. This study sought to determine if 1) the availability of year-round scheduling of annual autumn/winter influenza vaccination was associated with improved immunization rates for 2 high-risk populations of children and 2) this system was associated with early season vaccine administration. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis was utilized to compare immunization rates during the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 seasons. Billing records were used to determine eligible patients and vaccine receipt. A single, pediatric practice was studied, and two groups of patients were analyzed: 1) infants aged 6-23 months and 2) children <21 years old with asthma. As opposed to Year 1, in Year 2 appointments in "flu clinics" for the following autumn became available 7 months prior to when vaccine became available. Patients and providers could therefore schedule an immunization appointment throughout the year. Results: In Year 1, 552/1365 (40.4%) infants received at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine compared to 940/1265 (74.3%) in Year 2 (p < 0.001). For patients with asthma, 309/1332 (23.2%) received at least 1 dose of vaccine in Year 1 compared with 522/1489 (35.1%) in Year 2 (p <0.001). Both groups also achieved higher immunization rates between September and November in Year 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Year-round scheduling of influenza vaccination was associated with improved immunization rates in two high-risk populations, and may remove the barrier of scheduling difficulty, allow for a consistent year-round message from providers, and improve timing of vaccine administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-234
Number of pages5
JournalAmbulatory Pediatrics
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Fingerprint

Human Influenza
Immunization
Vaccination
Vaccines
Appointments and Schedules
Asthma
Immunization Schedule
Influenza Vaccines
Population
Cohort Studies
Pediatrics
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Paul, I., Eleoff, S. B., Shaffer, M. L., Bucher, R. M., Moyer, K. M., & Gusic, M. E. (2006). Improving Influenza Vaccination Rates for Children Through Year-round Scheduling. Ambulatory Pediatrics, 6(4), 230-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ambp.2006.04.006
Paul, Ian ; Eleoff, Sara B. ; Shaffer, Michele L. ; Bucher, Ryan M. ; Moyer, Kathleen M. ; Gusic, Maryellen E. / Improving Influenza Vaccination Rates for Children Through Year-round Scheduling. In: Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 230-234.
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Paul, I, Eleoff, SB, Shaffer, ML, Bucher, RM, Moyer, KM & Gusic, ME 2006, 'Improving Influenza Vaccination Rates for Children Through Year-round Scheduling', Ambulatory Pediatrics, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 230-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ambp.2006.04.006

Improving Influenza Vaccination Rates for Children Through Year-round Scheduling. / Paul, Ian; Eleoff, Sara B.; Shaffer, Michele L.; Bucher, Ryan M.; Moyer, Kathleen M.; Gusic, Maryellen E.

In: Ambulatory Pediatrics, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.07.2006, p. 230-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objective: Barriers to influenza vaccination negatively impact immunization rates contributing to the morbidity and mortality from influenza. This study sought to determine if 1) the availability of year-round scheduling of annual autumn/winter influenza vaccination was associated with improved immunization rates for 2 high-risk populations of children and 2) this system was associated with early season vaccine administration. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis was utilized to compare immunization rates during the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 seasons. Billing records were used to determine eligible patients and vaccine receipt. A single, pediatric practice was studied, and two groups of patients were analyzed: 1) infants aged 6-23 months and 2) children <21 years old with asthma. As opposed to Year 1, in Year 2 appointments in "flu clinics" for the following autumn became available 7 months prior to when vaccine became available. Patients and providers could therefore schedule an immunization appointment throughout the year. Results: In Year 1, 552/1365 (40.4%) infants received at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine compared to 940/1265 (74.3%) in Year 2 (p < 0.001). For patients with asthma, 309/1332 (23.2%) received at least 1 dose of vaccine in Year 1 compared with 522/1489 (35.1%) in Year 2 (p <0.001). Both groups also achieved higher immunization rates between September and November in Year 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Year-round scheduling of influenza vaccination was associated with improved immunization rates in two high-risk populations, and may remove the barrier of scheduling difficulty, allow for a consistent year-round message from providers, and improve timing of vaccine administration.

AB - Objective: Barriers to influenza vaccination negatively impact immunization rates contributing to the morbidity and mortality from influenza. This study sought to determine if 1) the availability of year-round scheduling of annual autumn/winter influenza vaccination was associated with improved immunization rates for 2 high-risk populations of children and 2) this system was associated with early season vaccine administration. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis was utilized to compare immunization rates during the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 seasons. Billing records were used to determine eligible patients and vaccine receipt. A single, pediatric practice was studied, and two groups of patients were analyzed: 1) infants aged 6-23 months and 2) children <21 years old with asthma. As opposed to Year 1, in Year 2 appointments in "flu clinics" for the following autumn became available 7 months prior to when vaccine became available. Patients and providers could therefore schedule an immunization appointment throughout the year. Results: In Year 1, 552/1365 (40.4%) infants received at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine compared to 940/1265 (74.3%) in Year 2 (p < 0.001). For patients with asthma, 309/1332 (23.2%) received at least 1 dose of vaccine in Year 1 compared with 522/1489 (35.1%) in Year 2 (p <0.001). Both groups also achieved higher immunization rates between September and November in Year 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Year-round scheduling of influenza vaccination was associated with improved immunization rates in two high-risk populations, and may remove the barrier of scheduling difficulty, allow for a consistent year-round message from providers, and improve timing of vaccine administration.

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