Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the long-term (6- and 12-month) effects of the Strong Healthy Women intervention on health-related behaviors, weight and body mass index (BMI), and weight gain during pregnancy. Strong Healthy Women is a small-group behavioral intervention for pre- and interconceptional women designed to modify key risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes; pretest-posttest findings from a randomized, controlled trial have been previously reported. The following questions are addressed: 1) were significant pretest-posttest changes in health-related behaviors (previously reported) maintained over the 12-month follow-up period; 2) did the intervention impact weight and BMI over the 12-month follow-up period; and 3) did the intervention impact pregnancy weight gain for those who gave birth during the follow-up period? Methods: Data are from 6- and 12-month follow-up telephone interviews of women in the original trial of the Strong Healthy Women intervention (n = 362) and from birth records for singleton births (n = 45) during the 12-month follow-up period. Repeated measures regression was used to evaluate intervention effects. Main Findings: At the 12-month follow-up, participants in the Strong Healthy Women intervention were significantly more likely than controls to use a daily multivitamin with folic acid and to have lower weight and BMI. The intervention's effect on reading food labels for nutritional values dropped off between the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Among those who gave birth to singletons during the follow-up period, women who participated in the intervention had lower average pregnancy weight gain compared with controls. Although the intervention effect was no longer significant when controlling for pre-pregnancy obesity, the adjusted means show a trend toward lower weight gain in the intervention group. Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence that the Strong Healthy Women behavior change intervention is effective in modifying important risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and may improve an important pregnancy outcome, weight gain during pregnancy. Because the intervention seems to help women manage their weight in the months after the intervention and during pregnancy, it may be an effective obesity prevention strategy for women before, during, and after the transition to motherhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-271
Number of pages7
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Fingerprint

Women's Health
pregnancy
health
Weight Gain
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Parturition
Obesity
Birth Certificates
Nutritive Value
Health
Folic Acid
Reading
telephone interview
Randomized Controlled Trials
motherhood
Interviews
small group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

@article{f3bc5d6200a1462e85c7b71702f66f8b,
title = "Improving Women's Preconceptional Health: Long-Term Effects of the Strong Healthy Women Behavior Change Intervention in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study",
abstract = "Purpose: To investigate the long-term (6- and 12-month) effects of the Strong Healthy Women intervention on health-related behaviors, weight and body mass index (BMI), and weight gain during pregnancy. Strong Healthy Women is a small-group behavioral intervention for pre- and interconceptional women designed to modify key risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes; pretest-posttest findings from a randomized, controlled trial have been previously reported. The following questions are addressed: 1) were significant pretest-posttest changes in health-related behaviors (previously reported) maintained over the 12-month follow-up period; 2) did the intervention impact weight and BMI over the 12-month follow-up period; and 3) did the intervention impact pregnancy weight gain for those who gave birth during the follow-up period? Methods: Data are from 6- and 12-month follow-up telephone interviews of women in the original trial of the Strong Healthy Women intervention (n = 362) and from birth records for singleton births (n = 45) during the 12-month follow-up period. Repeated measures regression was used to evaluate intervention effects. Main Findings: At the 12-month follow-up, participants in the Strong Healthy Women intervention were significantly more likely than controls to use a daily multivitamin with folic acid and to have lower weight and BMI. The intervention's effect on reading food labels for nutritional values dropped off between the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Among those who gave birth to singletons during the follow-up period, women who participated in the intervention had lower average pregnancy weight gain compared with controls. Although the intervention effect was no longer significant when controlling for pre-pregnancy obesity, the adjusted means show a trend toward lower weight gain in the intervention group. Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence that the Strong Healthy Women behavior change intervention is effective in modifying important risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and may improve an important pregnancy outcome, weight gain during pregnancy. Because the intervention seems to help women manage their weight in the months after the intervention and during pregnancy, it may be an effective obesity prevention strategy for women before, during, and after the transition to motherhood.",
author = "Weisman, {Carol S.} and Hillemeier, {Marianne M.} and Downs, {Danielle Symons} and Feinberg, {Mark E.} and Chuang, {Cynthia H.} and Botti, {John J.} and Dyer, {Anne Marie}",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.whi.2011.03.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "265--271",
journal = "Women's Health Issues",
issn = "1049-3867",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving Women's Preconceptional Health

T2 - Long-Term Effects of the Strong Healthy Women Behavior Change Intervention in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study

AU - Weisman, Carol S.

AU - Hillemeier, Marianne M.

AU - Downs, Danielle Symons

AU - Feinberg, Mark E.

AU - Chuang, Cynthia H.

AU - Botti, John J.

AU - Dyer, Anne Marie

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - Purpose: To investigate the long-term (6- and 12-month) effects of the Strong Healthy Women intervention on health-related behaviors, weight and body mass index (BMI), and weight gain during pregnancy. Strong Healthy Women is a small-group behavioral intervention for pre- and interconceptional women designed to modify key risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes; pretest-posttest findings from a randomized, controlled trial have been previously reported. The following questions are addressed: 1) were significant pretest-posttest changes in health-related behaviors (previously reported) maintained over the 12-month follow-up period; 2) did the intervention impact weight and BMI over the 12-month follow-up period; and 3) did the intervention impact pregnancy weight gain for those who gave birth during the follow-up period? Methods: Data are from 6- and 12-month follow-up telephone interviews of women in the original trial of the Strong Healthy Women intervention (n = 362) and from birth records for singleton births (n = 45) during the 12-month follow-up period. Repeated measures regression was used to evaluate intervention effects. Main Findings: At the 12-month follow-up, participants in the Strong Healthy Women intervention were significantly more likely than controls to use a daily multivitamin with folic acid and to have lower weight and BMI. The intervention's effect on reading food labels for nutritional values dropped off between the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Among those who gave birth to singletons during the follow-up period, women who participated in the intervention had lower average pregnancy weight gain compared with controls. Although the intervention effect was no longer significant when controlling for pre-pregnancy obesity, the adjusted means show a trend toward lower weight gain in the intervention group. Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence that the Strong Healthy Women behavior change intervention is effective in modifying important risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and may improve an important pregnancy outcome, weight gain during pregnancy. Because the intervention seems to help women manage their weight in the months after the intervention and during pregnancy, it may be an effective obesity prevention strategy for women before, during, and after the transition to motherhood.

AB - Purpose: To investigate the long-term (6- and 12-month) effects of the Strong Healthy Women intervention on health-related behaviors, weight and body mass index (BMI), and weight gain during pregnancy. Strong Healthy Women is a small-group behavioral intervention for pre- and interconceptional women designed to modify key risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes; pretest-posttest findings from a randomized, controlled trial have been previously reported. The following questions are addressed: 1) were significant pretest-posttest changes in health-related behaviors (previously reported) maintained over the 12-month follow-up period; 2) did the intervention impact weight and BMI over the 12-month follow-up period; and 3) did the intervention impact pregnancy weight gain for those who gave birth during the follow-up period? Methods: Data are from 6- and 12-month follow-up telephone interviews of women in the original trial of the Strong Healthy Women intervention (n = 362) and from birth records for singleton births (n = 45) during the 12-month follow-up period. Repeated measures regression was used to evaluate intervention effects. Main Findings: At the 12-month follow-up, participants in the Strong Healthy Women intervention were significantly more likely than controls to use a daily multivitamin with folic acid and to have lower weight and BMI. The intervention's effect on reading food labels for nutritional values dropped off between the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Among those who gave birth to singletons during the follow-up period, women who participated in the intervention had lower average pregnancy weight gain compared with controls. Although the intervention effect was no longer significant when controlling for pre-pregnancy obesity, the adjusted means show a trend toward lower weight gain in the intervention group. Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence that the Strong Healthy Women behavior change intervention is effective in modifying important risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and may improve an important pregnancy outcome, weight gain during pregnancy. Because the intervention seems to help women manage their weight in the months after the intervention and during pregnancy, it may be an effective obesity prevention strategy for women before, during, and after the transition to motherhood.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79959610673&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79959610673&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.whi.2011.03.007

DO - 10.1016/j.whi.2011.03.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 21536455

AN - SCOPUS:79959610673

VL - 21

SP - 265

EP - 271

JO - Women's Health Issues

JF - Women's Health Issues

SN - 1049-3867

IS - 4

ER -