In Pursuit of Females

Following and Contest Behavior by Males of a Namib Desert Tenebrionid Beetle, Physadesmia globosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male Physadesmia globosa beetles spend much of their active time following females, searching for single females, or contesting with other males for position behind females. Once paired with a female, a male does not feed, can seldom stay paired for more than a few min, and can mate only if the female stops moving. Females rarely stop moving unless they find a large food item, or burrow into the sand and become inactive. Thus, males expend great effort positioning themselves for opportunities to mate, which seldom arise. However, males do not display any alternative mating strategies, and none appear to be available, for females are scarce in relation to males, and do not become receptive to mating at any predictable times or places. 1987 Blackwell Verlag GmbH

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalEthology
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Tenebrionidae
deserts
beetle
desert
burrow
burrows
positioning
sand
Coleoptera
food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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title = "In Pursuit of Females: Following and Contest Behavior by Males of a Namib Desert Tenebrionid Beetle, Physadesmia globosa",
abstract = "Male Physadesmia globosa beetles spend much of their active time following females, searching for single females, or contesting with other males for position behind females. Once paired with a female, a male does not feed, can seldom stay paired for more than a few min, and can mate only if the female stops moving. Females rarely stop moving unless they find a large food item, or burrow into the sand and become inactive. Thus, males expend great effort positioning themselves for opportunities to mate, which seldom arise. However, males do not display any alternative mating strategies, and none appear to be available, for females are scarce in relation to males, and do not become receptive to mating at any predictable times or places. 1987 Blackwell Verlag GmbH",
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In Pursuit of Females : Following and Contest Behavior by Males of a Namib Desert Tenebrionid Beetle, Physadesmia globosa. / Marden, James Harold.

In: Ethology, Vol. 75, No. 1, 01.01.1987, p. 15-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Male Physadesmia globosa beetles spend much of their active time following females, searching for single females, or contesting with other males for position behind females. Once paired with a female, a male does not feed, can seldom stay paired for more than a few min, and can mate only if the female stops moving. Females rarely stop moving unless they find a large food item, or burrow into the sand and become inactive. Thus, males expend great effort positioning themselves for opportunities to mate, which seldom arise. However, males do not display any alternative mating strategies, and none appear to be available, for females are scarce in relation to males, and do not become receptive to mating at any predictable times or places. 1987 Blackwell Verlag GmbH

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