In Search of a New Paradigm for Teaching English as an International Language

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the context of more diverse communicative practices and social relations in globalization, scholars are increasingly defining English as constituting socially constructed situational norms in specific contexts of interaction, and not a homogeneous language or even discrete varieties of English. This shift requires treating pragmatics and not grammar, social context and not cognition, as more significant in accounting for one's language competence. To address such changes in pedagogical practice, language teachers have to focus more on developing procedural knowledge (i.e., a knowledge of how, or negotiation strategies) rather than propositional knowledge (i.e., a knowledge of what, or norms and conventions of a language) in their classrooms. This article illustrates how teachers can cultivate procedural knowledge by developing language awareness, rhetorical sensitivity, and negotiation strategies among their students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)767-785
Number of pages19
JournalTESOL Journal
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

paradigm
Teaching
language
teacher
Social Relations
grammar
cognition
pragmatics
English as an International Language
New Paradigm
Language
Teaching English
Procedural
globalization
classroom
interaction
student
Rhetoric
Propositional Knowledge
Grammar

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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In Search of a New Paradigm for Teaching English as an International Language. / Canagarajah, Suresh.

In: TESOL Journal, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 767-785.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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