In search of gender bias in evaluations and trait inferences: The role of diagnosticity and gender stereotypicality of behavioral information

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Meta-analytic reviews indicate that the gender of a target person has a significant but small impact on evaluators' judgments about this person. The present study examines the extent to which this small effect reflects evaluators' tendencies not to use an evaluatee's gender because they assume that case information about a target is more informative about his or her abilities, knowledge, and traits than is gender. The first study indicates that decreasing the diagnosticity of case information does not increase the tendency for people to be influenced by the target's gender. However, the first and second study illustrate that despite the weak influence of the target's gender, subjects are still using gender stereotypes when making social judgments about the evaluatee. This is evidenced by the impact of the stereotypicality of the case information. This is most clearly seen in Study 2, which illustrates how components of gender stereotypes are influencing judgments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-237
Number of pages25
JournalSex Roles
Volume29
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1993

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Sexism
gender
trend
evaluation
stereotype
social judgement
Aptitude
human being
ability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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