In Vitro Hemodynamic Evaluation of ECG-Synchronized Pulsatile Flow Using i-Cor Pump as Short-Term Cardiac Assist Device for Neonatal and Pediatric Population

Madison Force, Morgan Moroi, Shigang Wang, Allen Kunselman, Akif Undar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the hemodynamic properties of the i-cor ECG-synchronized cardiac assist system for off-label use as a short-term cardiac assist device for neonatal and pediatric patients and compare nonpulsatile to pulsatile flow with different amplitudes. The circuit consisted of the i-cor diagonal pump with 3 feet of ¼ inch arterial and venous tubing and a soft-shell reservoir, primed with lactated Ringer's solution and human packed red blood cells (hematocrit 42%). Trials were conducted with three different sets of cannulas (8-Fr arterial 10-Fr venous, 10-Fr arterial 12 Fr-venous, and 12-Fr arterial 14-Fr venous) with increasing flow rates at varying pseudo-patient pressures (40, 60, 80, and 100 mm Hg) and under nonpulsatile mode and pulsatile mode with pulsatile amplitudes 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm at 36°C. Pressure and flow waveforms were recorded using a custom-made data acquisition device for each trial. Energy equivalent pressure (EEP) was higher than mean pressure under pulsatile mode, and increased with increasing pseudo-patient's pressure and flow rate while EEP was the same as the mean pressure under nonpulsatile mode. Total hemodynamic energy (THE) levels increased with pressure and pulsatile amplitude and slightly decreased with increasing flow rate. The percent THE lost throughout the circuit increased with flow rate and pulsatile amplitude and decreased with pseudo-patient's pressure. SHE levels also increased with pseudo-patient pressure and pulsatile amplitude and decreased with increasing flow rate. The i-cor diagonal pump can be used as a short term cardiac assist device for neonatal and pediatric patients and is able to provide nonpulsatile as well as pulsatile flow. Compared with nonpulsatile flow, pulsatile flow can generate and deliver more hemodynamic energy to the patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E153-E167
JournalArtificial organs
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

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Pulsatile Flow
Pulsatile flow
Pediatrics
Hemodynamics
Electrocardiography
Pumps
Pressure
Equipment and Supplies
Population
Flow rate
In Vitro Techniques
Off-Label Use
Networks (circuits)
Tubing
Hematocrit
Electron energy levels
Labels
Data acquisition
Blood
Erythrocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "In Vitro Hemodynamic Evaluation of ECG-Synchronized Pulsatile Flow Using i-Cor Pump as Short-Term Cardiac Assist Device for Neonatal and Pediatric Population",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to assess the hemodynamic properties of the i-cor ECG-synchronized cardiac assist system for off-label use as a short-term cardiac assist device for neonatal and pediatric patients and compare nonpulsatile to pulsatile flow with different amplitudes. The circuit consisted of the i-cor diagonal pump with 3 feet of ¼ inch arterial and venous tubing and a soft-shell reservoir, primed with lactated Ringer's solution and human packed red blood cells (hematocrit 42{\%}). Trials were conducted with three different sets of cannulas (8-Fr arterial 10-Fr venous, 10-Fr arterial 12 Fr-venous, and 12-Fr arterial 14-Fr venous) with increasing flow rates at varying pseudo-patient pressures (40, 60, 80, and 100 mm Hg) and under nonpulsatile mode and pulsatile mode with pulsatile amplitudes 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm at 36°C. Pressure and flow waveforms were recorded using a custom-made data acquisition device for each trial. Energy equivalent pressure (EEP) was higher than mean pressure under pulsatile mode, and increased with increasing pseudo-patient's pressure and flow rate while EEP was the same as the mean pressure under nonpulsatile mode. Total hemodynamic energy (THE) levels increased with pressure and pulsatile amplitude and slightly decreased with increasing flow rate. The percent THE lost throughout the circuit increased with flow rate and pulsatile amplitude and decreased with pseudo-patient's pressure. SHE levels also increased with pseudo-patient pressure and pulsatile amplitude and decreased with increasing flow rate. The i-cor diagonal pump can be used as a short term cardiac assist device for neonatal and pediatric patients and is able to provide nonpulsatile as well as pulsatile flow. Compared with nonpulsatile flow, pulsatile flow can generate and deliver more hemodynamic energy to the patients.",
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In Vitro Hemodynamic Evaluation of ECG-Synchronized Pulsatile Flow Using i-Cor Pump as Short-Term Cardiac Assist Device for Neonatal and Pediatric Population. / Force, Madison; Moroi, Morgan; Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen; Undar, Akif.

In: Artificial organs, Vol. 42, No. 8, 08.2018, p. E153-E167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The objective of this study was to assess the hemodynamic properties of the i-cor ECG-synchronized cardiac assist system for off-label use as a short-term cardiac assist device for neonatal and pediatric patients and compare nonpulsatile to pulsatile flow with different amplitudes. The circuit consisted of the i-cor diagonal pump with 3 feet of ¼ inch arterial and venous tubing and a soft-shell reservoir, primed with lactated Ringer's solution and human packed red blood cells (hematocrit 42%). Trials were conducted with three different sets of cannulas (8-Fr arterial 10-Fr venous, 10-Fr arterial 12 Fr-venous, and 12-Fr arterial 14-Fr venous) with increasing flow rates at varying pseudo-patient pressures (40, 60, 80, and 100 mm Hg) and under nonpulsatile mode and pulsatile mode with pulsatile amplitudes 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm at 36°C. Pressure and flow waveforms were recorded using a custom-made data acquisition device for each trial. Energy equivalent pressure (EEP) was higher than mean pressure under pulsatile mode, and increased with increasing pseudo-patient's pressure and flow rate while EEP was the same as the mean pressure under nonpulsatile mode. Total hemodynamic energy (THE) levels increased with pressure and pulsatile amplitude and slightly decreased with increasing flow rate. The percent THE lost throughout the circuit increased with flow rate and pulsatile amplitude and decreased with pseudo-patient's pressure. SHE levels also increased with pseudo-patient pressure and pulsatile amplitude and decreased with increasing flow rate. The i-cor diagonal pump can be used as a short term cardiac assist device for neonatal and pediatric patients and is able to provide nonpulsatile as well as pulsatile flow. Compared with nonpulsatile flow, pulsatile flow can generate and deliver more hemodynamic energy to the patients.

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