Including preference in anthropometry-driven models for design

Christopher J. Garneau, Matthew B. Parkinson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in body dimensions (called "anthropometry") is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, anthropometry is not the only predictor of these kinds of interactions. For example, two vehicle drivers with similar body dimensions might have very different preferred locations for the seat. The variability not predicted by body dimensions can be considered "preference". Well-conceived models considering all sources of variability can can facilitate the application of design automation tools such as optimization and robust design methodologies, resulting in products that are safer, cost effective, and more accessible to broader populations (including people with disabilities). In contrast, poor models and those that fail to include a preference component can produce misleading results that under- or over-approximate accommodation and prescribe inappropriate amounts of adjustability. This paper reviews common methods of designing for human variability, demonstrating the use and strengths and weaknesses of each. This is done in the context of a simple, univariate case study to determine the appropriate allocation of adjustability to achieve a desired accommodation level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC2007
Pages397-404
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 2008
Event33rd Design Automation Conference, presented at - 2007 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2007 - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: Sep 4 2007Sep 7 2007

Publication series

Name2007 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC2007
Volume6 PART A

Other

Other33rd Design Automation Conference, presented at - 2007 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2007
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period9/4/079/7/07

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Modeling and Simulation

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    Garneau, C. J., & Parkinson, M. B. (2008). Including preference in anthropometry-driven models for design. In 2007 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC2007 (pp. 397-404). (2007 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC2007; Vol. 6 PART A). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2007-35479