Income Differences in Perceived Neighborhood Environment Characteristics among African American Women

Heather J. Adamus-Leach, Scherezade K. Mama, Daniel P. O'Connor, Rebecca E. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Perceptions of neighborhood attributes for physical activity may be influenced by individual level income. This study examined differences in perceptions of neighborhood attributes for walking and bicycling in high and low income African American women. African American women (n = 388) aged 20-65 years completed the International Physical Activity Prevalence Study's Environmental Survey Module. Independent t-tests determined differences in perceptions of neighborhood attributes by income group. Principal component factor analysis explored differences in factor structure for survey items. Low income African American women perceived their neighborhood as being less safe with regard to crime and traffic, having fewer free recreational opportunities, and having more public transportation stops nearby. Survey items weighed differently on each factor between income groups. Household income should be taken into consideration when interpreting perceptions of neighborhood for physical activity in African American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEnvironmental Health Insights
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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African American
African Americans
income
physical activity
Crime
Factor analysis
Exercise
Bicycling
household income
crime
walking
factor analysis
Principal Component Analysis
Statistical Factor Analysis
Walking
woman
Cross-Sectional Studies
attribute
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Pollution

Cite this

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Income Differences in Perceived Neighborhood Environment Characteristics among African American Women. / Adamus-Leach, Heather J.; Mama, Scherezade K.; O'Connor, Daniel P.; Lee, Rebecca E.

In: Environmental Health Insights, Vol. 6, 01.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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