Income poverty and material hardship: How strong is the association?

John Iceland, Kurt J. Bauman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Material deprivation has been measured in a variety of ways, such as in terms of income shortfalls or the experience of different types of material hardship. This paper tests the extent to which indicators of hardship are associated with income poverty. Using a U.S. dataset with detailed income and poverty information observed over a few years, we find that timing, duration, and depth of poverty are all associated with material hardships (food insecurity, difficulty meeting basic needs, lack of consumer durables, housing problems, neighborhood problems, and fear of crime). Even very short spells of poverty have a measurable impact on material well-being, although not all types of well-being are affected in equal measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-396
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Socio-Economics
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

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Poverty
poverty
income
well-being
Food Supply
nutrition situation
basic need
Crime
deprivation
Fear
housing
offense
anxiety
Income poverty
lack
experience
Well-being
Income

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Income poverty and material hardship : How strong is the association? / Iceland, John; Bauman, Kurt J.

In: Journal of Socio-Economics, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.06.2007, p. 376-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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