Incorporating origin and process in migration-fertility frameworks: The case of Puerto Rican women

Susan G. Singley, Nancy S. Landale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using life history data from both origin and destination areas, we examine the relationship between migration and fertility among Puerto Rican women. Our analysis extends previous research by including origin data; by measuring precisely the timing of migration, fertility, and time-varying covariates; and by including single women in the analysis. Results reveal that single U.S.-born nonmigrants have significantly higher rates of transition to first birth than nonmigrants in Puerto Rico, while married and cohabiting U.S.-born nonmigrants have significantly lower rates. Selection effects for both single and married/cohabiting women indicate that migration to the U.S. is an integral part of the family formation process. Our results highlight the need for a broadening of the traditional migration-fertility framework to encompass a wider range of family formation processes, including nonmarital fertility and union formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1437-1464
Number of pages28
JournalSocial Forces
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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