Incorporating simulation technology into a neurology clerkship

David Matthew Ermak, Douglas W. Bower, Jody Wood, Elizabeth H. Sinz, Milind J. Kothari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Simulation-based medical education is growing in use and popularity in various settings and specialties. A literature review yields scant information about the use of simulation-based medical education in neurology, however. The specialty of neurology presents an interesting challenge to the field of simulation-based medical education because of the inability of even the most advanced mannequins to mimic a focal neurologic deficit. The authors present simulator protocols for status epilepticus and acute stroke that use a high-fidelity mannequin despite its inability to mimic a focal neurologic deficit. These protocols are used in the training of third- and fourth-year medical students during their neurology clerkship at Penn State College of Medicine. The authors also provide a review of the pertinent literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-635
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Osteopathic Association
Volume113
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

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Neurology
Medical Education
Manikins
Neurologic Manifestations
Technology
State Medicine
Status Epilepticus
Medical Students
Stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ermak, David Matthew ; Bower, Douglas W. ; Wood, Jody ; Sinz, Elizabeth H. ; Kothari, Milind J. / Incorporating simulation technology into a neurology clerkship. In: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 2013 ; Vol. 113, No. 8. pp. 628-635.
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Incorporating simulation technology into a neurology clerkship. / Ermak, David Matthew; Bower, Douglas W.; Wood, Jody; Sinz, Elizabeth H.; Kothari, Milind J.

In: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, Vol. 113, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 628-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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