Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety

Alexandria Meyer, Greg Hajcak, Dana C. Torpey, Autumn Kujawa, Jiyon Kim, Sara Bufferd, Gabrielle Carlson, Daniel N. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anxiety disorders are the most frequently diagnosed form of psychopathology in children and often result in chronic impairment that persists into adulthood. Identifying neurobehavioral correlates of anxiety that appear relatively early in life would inform etiological models of development and allow intervention and prevention strategies to be implemented more effectively. The error-related negativity (ERN), a negative deflection in the event-related potential at fronto-central sites approximately 50 ms following the commission of errors, has been consistently found to be larger among anxious adults. The current study sought to extend these findings to even younger individuals: the ERN was elicited by a Go/NoGo task in 48 six year-old children with a clinical anxiety disorder assessed by diagnostic interview and 48 age-matched controls. In addition to child anxiety disorder, the ERN was examined in relation to maternal history of anxiety disorder, which was previously related to a smaller ERN. Anxious children were characterized by a larger (i.e.; more negative) ERN and maternal history of anxiety disorder was associated with a smaller ERN. Thus, the relationship between an increased ERN and clinical anxiety is evident by age 6, and this effect appears independent from an opposing influence of maternal anxiety history on the ERN. These findings support the ERN as a promising neurobehavioral marker of anxiety, and implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1257-1266
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Anxiety Disorders
Anxiety
Brain
Mothers
Psychopathology
Evoked Potentials
History
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Meyer, A., Hajcak, G., Torpey, D. C., Kujawa, A., Kim, J., Bufferd, S., ... Klein, D. N. (2013). Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 41(8), 1257-1266. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-013-9762-8
Meyer, Alexandria ; Hajcak, Greg ; Torpey, Dana C. ; Kujawa, Autumn ; Kim, Jiyon ; Bufferd, Sara ; Carlson, Gabrielle ; Klein, Daniel N. / Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety. In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 41, No. 8. pp. 1257-1266.
@article{fe1567e83bdf4bc2b5f494eb8e608d56,
title = "Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety",
abstract = "Anxiety disorders are the most frequently diagnosed form of psychopathology in children and often result in chronic impairment that persists into adulthood. Identifying neurobehavioral correlates of anxiety that appear relatively early in life would inform etiological models of development and allow intervention and prevention strategies to be implemented more effectively. The error-related negativity (ERN), a negative deflection in the event-related potential at fronto-central sites approximately 50 ms following the commission of errors, has been consistently found to be larger among anxious adults. The current study sought to extend these findings to even younger individuals: the ERN was elicited by a Go/NoGo task in 48 six year-old children with a clinical anxiety disorder assessed by diagnostic interview and 48 age-matched controls. In addition to child anxiety disorder, the ERN was examined in relation to maternal history of anxiety disorder, which was previously related to a smaller ERN. Anxious children were characterized by a larger (i.e.; more negative) ERN and maternal history of anxiety disorder was associated with a smaller ERN. Thus, the relationship between an increased ERN and clinical anxiety is evident by age 6, and this effect appears independent from an opposing influence of maternal anxiety history on the ERN. These findings support the ERN as a promising neurobehavioral marker of anxiety, and implications are discussed.",
author = "Alexandria Meyer and Greg Hajcak and Torpey, {Dana C.} and Autumn Kujawa and Jiyon Kim and Sara Bufferd and Gabrielle Carlson and Klein, {Daniel N.}",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10802-013-9762-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "1257--1266",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology",
issn = "0091-0627",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "8",

}

Meyer, A, Hajcak, G, Torpey, DC, Kujawa, A, Kim, J, Bufferd, S, Carlson, G & Klein, DN 2013, 'Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety', Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 1257-1266. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-013-9762-8

Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety. / Meyer, Alexandria; Hajcak, Greg; Torpey, Dana C.; Kujawa, Autumn; Kim, Jiyon; Bufferd, Sara; Carlson, Gabrielle; Klein, Daniel N.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 41, No. 8, 01.11.2013, p. 1257-1266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased error-related brain activity in six-year-old children with clinical anxiety

AU - Meyer, Alexandria

AU - Hajcak, Greg

AU - Torpey, Dana C.

AU - Kujawa, Autumn

AU - Kim, Jiyon

AU - Bufferd, Sara

AU - Carlson, Gabrielle

AU - Klein, Daniel N.

PY - 2013/11/1

Y1 - 2013/11/1

N2 - Anxiety disorders are the most frequently diagnosed form of psychopathology in children and often result in chronic impairment that persists into adulthood. Identifying neurobehavioral correlates of anxiety that appear relatively early in life would inform etiological models of development and allow intervention and prevention strategies to be implemented more effectively. The error-related negativity (ERN), a negative deflection in the event-related potential at fronto-central sites approximately 50 ms following the commission of errors, has been consistently found to be larger among anxious adults. The current study sought to extend these findings to even younger individuals: the ERN was elicited by a Go/NoGo task in 48 six year-old children with a clinical anxiety disorder assessed by diagnostic interview and 48 age-matched controls. In addition to child anxiety disorder, the ERN was examined in relation to maternal history of anxiety disorder, which was previously related to a smaller ERN. Anxious children were characterized by a larger (i.e.; more negative) ERN and maternal history of anxiety disorder was associated with a smaller ERN. Thus, the relationship between an increased ERN and clinical anxiety is evident by age 6, and this effect appears independent from an opposing influence of maternal anxiety history on the ERN. These findings support the ERN as a promising neurobehavioral marker of anxiety, and implications are discussed.

AB - Anxiety disorders are the most frequently diagnosed form of psychopathology in children and often result in chronic impairment that persists into adulthood. Identifying neurobehavioral correlates of anxiety that appear relatively early in life would inform etiological models of development and allow intervention and prevention strategies to be implemented more effectively. The error-related negativity (ERN), a negative deflection in the event-related potential at fronto-central sites approximately 50 ms following the commission of errors, has been consistently found to be larger among anxious adults. The current study sought to extend these findings to even younger individuals: the ERN was elicited by a Go/NoGo task in 48 six year-old children with a clinical anxiety disorder assessed by diagnostic interview and 48 age-matched controls. In addition to child anxiety disorder, the ERN was examined in relation to maternal history of anxiety disorder, which was previously related to a smaller ERN. Anxious children were characterized by a larger (i.e.; more negative) ERN and maternal history of anxiety disorder was associated with a smaller ERN. Thus, the relationship between an increased ERN and clinical anxiety is evident by age 6, and this effect appears independent from an opposing influence of maternal anxiety history on the ERN. These findings support the ERN as a promising neurobehavioral marker of anxiety, and implications are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885954214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84885954214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10802-013-9762-8

DO - 10.1007/s10802-013-9762-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 23700171

AN - SCOPUS:84885954214

VL - 41

SP - 1257

EP - 1266

JO - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

SN - 0091-0627

IS - 8

ER -