Increasing clindamycin resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 57 northeast United States military treatment facilities

Lo Ranee Braun, David Craft, Roberta Williams, Francois Tuamokumo, Martin Ottolini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increasing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has led many to use clindamycin for CA-MRSA disease, whereas others suggest caution because of inducible clindamycin resistance and rely on drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). Aim: To analyze the change in antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates from 2001 to 2004 in a closed health care system, a period during which clindamycin and TMP-SMX use increased 99 and 62%, respectively. Methods: S. aureus cultures from 57 military hospitals and clinics from 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 were compared for body site and antibiotic sensitivity, particularly the potentially inducible clindamycin-susceptible erythromycin-resistant pattern. A portion was evaluated by a double disk diffusion test (D test). Results: Numbers of S. aureus-positive cultures obtained from "wound" sites rose significantly in both pediatric (138 to 215, P < 0.001) and adult (715 to 972, P < 0.001) isolates, with a rise in MRSA in children (6 of 138 to 60 of 215, P < 0.001) and in adults (161 of 715 to 324 of 972, P < 0.001). Clindamycin resistance increased among pediatric S. aureus isolates (1 of 207 to 13 of 327, P < 0.05), whereas >96% remained TMP-SMX-susceptible. Five methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 2 MRSA of 41 pediatric and 36 MSSA, 43 MRSA of 437 adult S. aureus specimens were D test-positive. Conclusions: In late 2004, most S. aureus from our region are still β-lactam-susceptible. Most of the MRSA are still susceptible to clindamycin and do not appear to have inducible resistance. We must closely monitor the rates of constitutive and inducible clindamycin resistance as well as consider treatment alternatives that may slow the rate of clindamycin resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-626
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Military Facilities
Clindamycin
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Methicillin
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Lactams
Military Hospitals
Erythromycin
Delivery of Health Care
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{b154d47830544f89b07724b42e03a9e8,
title = "Increasing clindamycin resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 57 northeast United States military treatment facilities",
abstract = "Background: Increasing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has led many to use clindamycin for CA-MRSA disease, whereas others suggest caution because of inducible clindamycin resistance and rely on drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). Aim: To analyze the change in antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates from 2001 to 2004 in a closed health care system, a period during which clindamycin and TMP-SMX use increased 99 and 62{\%}, respectively. Methods: S. aureus cultures from 57 military hospitals and clinics from 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 were compared for body site and antibiotic sensitivity, particularly the potentially inducible clindamycin-susceptible erythromycin-resistant pattern. A portion was evaluated by a double disk diffusion test (D test). Results: Numbers of S. aureus-positive cultures obtained from {"}wound{"} sites rose significantly in both pediatric (138 to 215, P < 0.001) and adult (715 to 972, P < 0.001) isolates, with a rise in MRSA in children (6 of 138 to 60 of 215, P < 0.001) and in adults (161 of 715 to 324 of 972, P < 0.001). Clindamycin resistance increased among pediatric S. aureus isolates (1 of 207 to 13 of 327, P < 0.05), whereas >96{\%} remained TMP-SMX-susceptible. Five methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 2 MRSA of 41 pediatric and 36 MSSA, 43 MRSA of 437 adult S. aureus specimens were D test-positive. Conclusions: In late 2004, most S. aureus from our region are still β-lactam-susceptible. Most of the MRSA are still susceptible to clindamycin and do not appear to have inducible resistance. We must closely monitor the rates of constitutive and inducible clindamycin resistance as well as consider treatment alternatives that may slow the rate of clindamycin resistance.",
author = "Braun, {Lo Ranee} and David Craft and Roberta Williams and Francois Tuamokumo and Martin Ottolini",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.inf.0000171175.76673.64",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "622--626",
journal = "Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal",
issn = "0891-3668",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

Increasing clindamycin resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 57 northeast United States military treatment facilities. / Braun, Lo Ranee; Craft, David; Williams, Roberta; Tuamokumo, Francois; Ottolini, Martin.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 24, No. 7, 01.01.2005, p. 622-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increasing clindamycin resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 57 northeast United States military treatment facilities

AU - Braun, Lo Ranee

AU - Craft, David

AU - Williams, Roberta

AU - Tuamokumo, Francois

AU - Ottolini, Martin

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Background: Increasing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has led many to use clindamycin for CA-MRSA disease, whereas others suggest caution because of inducible clindamycin resistance and rely on drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). Aim: To analyze the change in antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates from 2001 to 2004 in a closed health care system, a period during which clindamycin and TMP-SMX use increased 99 and 62%, respectively. Methods: S. aureus cultures from 57 military hospitals and clinics from 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 were compared for body site and antibiotic sensitivity, particularly the potentially inducible clindamycin-susceptible erythromycin-resistant pattern. A portion was evaluated by a double disk diffusion test (D test). Results: Numbers of S. aureus-positive cultures obtained from "wound" sites rose significantly in both pediatric (138 to 215, P < 0.001) and adult (715 to 972, P < 0.001) isolates, with a rise in MRSA in children (6 of 138 to 60 of 215, P < 0.001) and in adults (161 of 715 to 324 of 972, P < 0.001). Clindamycin resistance increased among pediatric S. aureus isolates (1 of 207 to 13 of 327, P < 0.05), whereas >96% remained TMP-SMX-susceptible. Five methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 2 MRSA of 41 pediatric and 36 MSSA, 43 MRSA of 437 adult S. aureus specimens were D test-positive. Conclusions: In late 2004, most S. aureus from our region are still β-lactam-susceptible. Most of the MRSA are still susceptible to clindamycin and do not appear to have inducible resistance. We must closely monitor the rates of constitutive and inducible clindamycin resistance as well as consider treatment alternatives that may slow the rate of clindamycin resistance.

AB - Background: Increasing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has led many to use clindamycin for CA-MRSA disease, whereas others suggest caution because of inducible clindamycin resistance and rely on drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). Aim: To analyze the change in antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates from 2001 to 2004 in a closed health care system, a period during which clindamycin and TMP-SMX use increased 99 and 62%, respectively. Methods: S. aureus cultures from 57 military hospitals and clinics from 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 were compared for body site and antibiotic sensitivity, particularly the potentially inducible clindamycin-susceptible erythromycin-resistant pattern. A portion was evaluated by a double disk diffusion test (D test). Results: Numbers of S. aureus-positive cultures obtained from "wound" sites rose significantly in both pediatric (138 to 215, P < 0.001) and adult (715 to 972, P < 0.001) isolates, with a rise in MRSA in children (6 of 138 to 60 of 215, P < 0.001) and in adults (161 of 715 to 324 of 972, P < 0.001). Clindamycin resistance increased among pediatric S. aureus isolates (1 of 207 to 13 of 327, P < 0.05), whereas >96% remained TMP-SMX-susceptible. Five methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 2 MRSA of 41 pediatric and 36 MSSA, 43 MRSA of 437 adult S. aureus specimens were D test-positive. Conclusions: In late 2004, most S. aureus from our region are still β-lactam-susceptible. Most of the MRSA are still susceptible to clindamycin and do not appear to have inducible resistance. We must closely monitor the rates of constitutive and inducible clindamycin resistance as well as consider treatment alternatives that may slow the rate of clindamycin resistance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=22244476767&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=22244476767&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.inf.0000171175.76673.64

DO - 10.1097/01.inf.0000171175.76673.64

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 622

EP - 626

JO - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

JF - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

SN - 0891-3668

IS - 7

ER -