Independent and interactive effects of Apolipoprotein E phenotype and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma lipids

Kathryn H. Schmitz, Pamela J. Schreiner, David R. Jacobs, Arthur S. Leon, Kiang Liu, Barbara Howard, Barbara Sternfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine whether the association Apolipoprotein E (Apo E) phenotype with plasma lipids is influenced by physical fitness level. Also, to explore the interactive and independent relative contributions of Apo E phenotype, fitness (or physical activity), and other modifiable factors to variation in plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein (HDL-C) levels at baseline and over a seven-year follow-up. METHODS: Physical fitness (duration of a graded treadmill test), Apo E phenotype, plasma LDL-C and HDL-C, and covariates were measured at baseline and seven years later in a bi-racial cohort of young adults, aged 18-30 years at baseline in 1985-86 (N = 3629), from the Coronary Artery Risk Development In Young Adults (CARDIA) study. RESULTS: Fitness did not influence the associations of Apo E and LDL-C or HDL-C. The independent effects of several modifiable variables (changes in Keys' score, smoking, oral contraceptive use, education, body weight, alcohol intake, and fitness), when combined, contributed considerably more than Apo E to the variance in LDL-C changes (6.74% or 8.71% for combined modifiable variables vs. 1.27% or 0.90% for ApoE, in women or men, respectively) and HDL-C changes (13.11% or 12.66% for combined modifiable variables vs. 0.12% or 0.02% for ApoE, in women or men, respectively). The pattern of findings was similar when self-reported physical activity was substituted for fitness. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in modifiable factors, including fitness, may be stronger correlates of changes in LDL-C and HDL-C over time than the immutable factor, Apo E phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-103
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2001

Fingerprint

Apolipoproteins E
Phenotype
Lipids
Physical Fitness
Young Adult
Exercise
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
HDL Lipoproteins
Oral Contraceptives
Exercise Test
LDL Lipoproteins
Coronary Vessels
Smoking
Body Weight
Alcohols
Education
oxidized low density lipoprotein

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Schmitz, Kathryn H. ; Schreiner, Pamela J. ; Jacobs, David R. ; Leon, Arthur S. ; Liu, Kiang ; Howard, Barbara ; Sternfeld, Barbara. / Independent and interactive effects of Apolipoprotein E phenotype and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma lipids. In: Annals of Epidemiology. 2001 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 94-103.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To examine whether the association Apolipoprotein E (Apo E) phenotype with plasma lipids is influenced by physical fitness level. Also, to explore the interactive and independent relative contributions of Apo E phenotype, fitness (or physical activity), and other modifiable factors to variation in plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein (HDL-C) levels at baseline and over a seven-year follow-up. METHODS: Physical fitness (duration of a graded treadmill test), Apo E phenotype, plasma LDL-C and HDL-C, and covariates were measured at baseline and seven years later in a bi-racial cohort of young adults, aged 18-30 years at baseline in 1985-86 (N = 3629), from the Coronary Artery Risk Development In Young Adults (CARDIA) study. RESULTS: Fitness did not influence the associations of Apo E and LDL-C or HDL-C. The independent effects of several modifiable variables (changes in Keys' score, smoking, oral contraceptive use, education, body weight, alcohol intake, and fitness), when combined, contributed considerably more than Apo E to the variance in LDL-C changes (6.74{\%} or 8.71{\%} for combined modifiable variables vs. 1.27{\%} or 0.90{\%} for ApoE, in women or men, respectively) and HDL-C changes (13.11{\%} or 12.66{\%} for combined modifiable variables vs. 0.12{\%} or 0.02{\%} for ApoE, in women or men, respectively). The pattern of findings was similar when self-reported physical activity was substituted for fitness. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in modifiable factors, including fitness, may be stronger correlates of changes in LDL-C and HDL-C over time than the immutable factor, Apo E phenotype.",
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Independent and interactive effects of Apolipoprotein E phenotype and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma lipids. / Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Jacobs, David R.; Leon, Arthur S.; Liu, Kiang; Howard, Barbara; Sternfeld, Barbara.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 30.01.2001, p. 94-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Independent and interactive effects of Apolipoprotein E phenotype and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma lipids

AU - Schmitz, Kathryn H.

AU - Schreiner, Pamela J.

AU - Jacobs, David R.

AU - Leon, Arthur S.

AU - Liu, Kiang

AU - Howard, Barbara

AU - Sternfeld, Barbara

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N2 - PURPOSE: To examine whether the association Apolipoprotein E (Apo E) phenotype with plasma lipids is influenced by physical fitness level. Also, to explore the interactive and independent relative contributions of Apo E phenotype, fitness (or physical activity), and other modifiable factors to variation in plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein (HDL-C) levels at baseline and over a seven-year follow-up. METHODS: Physical fitness (duration of a graded treadmill test), Apo E phenotype, plasma LDL-C and HDL-C, and covariates were measured at baseline and seven years later in a bi-racial cohort of young adults, aged 18-30 years at baseline in 1985-86 (N = 3629), from the Coronary Artery Risk Development In Young Adults (CARDIA) study. RESULTS: Fitness did not influence the associations of Apo E and LDL-C or HDL-C. The independent effects of several modifiable variables (changes in Keys' score, smoking, oral contraceptive use, education, body weight, alcohol intake, and fitness), when combined, contributed considerably more than Apo E to the variance in LDL-C changes (6.74% or 8.71% for combined modifiable variables vs. 1.27% or 0.90% for ApoE, in women or men, respectively) and HDL-C changes (13.11% or 12.66% for combined modifiable variables vs. 0.12% or 0.02% for ApoE, in women or men, respectively). The pattern of findings was similar when self-reported physical activity was substituted for fitness. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in modifiable factors, including fitness, may be stronger correlates of changes in LDL-C and HDL-C over time than the immutable factor, Apo E phenotype.

AB - PURPOSE: To examine whether the association Apolipoprotein E (Apo E) phenotype with plasma lipids is influenced by physical fitness level. Also, to explore the interactive and independent relative contributions of Apo E phenotype, fitness (or physical activity), and other modifiable factors to variation in plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein (HDL-C) levels at baseline and over a seven-year follow-up. METHODS: Physical fitness (duration of a graded treadmill test), Apo E phenotype, plasma LDL-C and HDL-C, and covariates were measured at baseline and seven years later in a bi-racial cohort of young adults, aged 18-30 years at baseline in 1985-86 (N = 3629), from the Coronary Artery Risk Development In Young Adults (CARDIA) study. RESULTS: Fitness did not influence the associations of Apo E and LDL-C or HDL-C. The independent effects of several modifiable variables (changes in Keys' score, smoking, oral contraceptive use, education, body weight, alcohol intake, and fitness), when combined, contributed considerably more than Apo E to the variance in LDL-C changes (6.74% or 8.71% for combined modifiable variables vs. 1.27% or 0.90% for ApoE, in women or men, respectively) and HDL-C changes (13.11% or 12.66% for combined modifiable variables vs. 0.12% or 0.02% for ApoE, in women or men, respectively). The pattern of findings was similar when self-reported physical activity was substituted for fitness. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in modifiable factors, including fitness, may be stronger correlates of changes in LDL-C and HDL-C over time than the immutable factor, Apo E phenotype.

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