Individual differences in visual-geometric illusions: Predictions from measures of spatial cognitive abilities

Stanley Coren, Clare Kathleen Porac

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

A sample of 490 observers was tested on 26 illusion variants and five tests of spatial ability. There was some suggestion that overall perceptual accuracy was related to perceptual ability. More importantly, the individual differences in the magnitude of visual illusions scores were significantly predicted by spatial abilities measures. The general relationship suggested that higher levels of spatial ability were associated with reduced illusion magnitude; however, a canonical correlation analysis revealed that the direction of this relationship depended on the type of illusion. Illusions of linear extent showed an inverse relationship between the two sets of measures, with higher levels of spatial abilities associated with lower degrees of illusion susceptibility. High spatial skills scores were related positively to illusion magnitude for illusions of area and direction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-219
Number of pages9
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1987

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

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