Individual pituitary neuropeptides do not recapitulate the effects of repository corticotropin (Acthar®) on human B cells in vitro

Ann L. Benko, A. Dale Wright, Teresa Sunyer, Nancy J. Olsen, William J. Kovacs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Repository corticotropin injection (RCI), a complex mixture of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analogs and other pituitary peptides, has been found to suppress key aspects of gene expression and cellular function in human B lymphocytes in vitro. The present studies reveal that neither individual POMC peptides (α-MSH, ACTH1-39, ACTH1-24, β-endorphin) nor other related pituitary neuropeptides are sufficient to elicit these effects, even though specific receptors capable of transmitting signals from these peptides are expressed by human B cells. RCI's direct effects on human B cells may require complementary signals from multiple components of the preparation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number577522
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume353
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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