Inexpensive urinalysis test strips to screen for diabetes in developing countries

Nathan Arnett, Alice Vergani, Amanda Winkler, Sarah C. Ritter, Khanjan Mehta

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly experiencing the double burden of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Many of these diseases, including diabetes, remain prevalent despite the availability of viable treatment options. Lack of access to screening tools frequently prevents individuals from seeking a diagnosis or pursuing treatment. The development of alternative screening devices in the form of low cost test strips has the potential to surmount existing barriers to treatment, allowing earlier intervention in the progression of diabetes. This article presents a demonstration that modified published protocols for glucose and ketone detection in solution - two of the principal chemical signatures of diabetes - are reproducible on test strips manufactured using composite rubber-foam stamps to print chemical reagents on filter paper. These test strips contain specific chemicals which, in the presence of disease markers, cause a visible color change and defined intensity gradient that can be experimentally verified. The creation of an affordable and effective urinalysis test strip has the ability to make screening for disease more accessible in developing nations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference
Subtitle of host publicationTechnology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages589-596
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781509024322
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Event6th Annual IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2016 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Oct 13 2016Oct 16 2016

Publication series

NameGHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings

Other

Other6th Annual IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period10/13/1610/16/16

Fingerprint

Urinalysis
diabetes
Medical problems
Developing countries
Developing Countries
chronic illness
developing world
developing country
Disease
Screening
Foamed rubber
Africa South of the Sahara
Rubber
Ketones
Communicable Diseases
ketone
Color
foam
rubber
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Arnett, N., Vergani, A., Winkler, A., Ritter, S. C., & Mehta, K. (2016). Inexpensive urinalysis test strips to screen for diabetes in developing countries. In GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings (pp. 589-596). [7857339] (GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2016.7857339
Arnett, Nathan ; Vergani, Alice ; Winkler, Amanda ; Ritter, Sarah C. ; Mehta, Khanjan. / Inexpensive urinalysis test strips to screen for diabetes in developing countries. GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. pp. 589-596 (GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings).
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Arnett, N, Vergani, A, Winkler, A, Ritter, SC & Mehta, K 2016, Inexpensive urinalysis test strips to screen for diabetes in developing countries. in GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings., 7857339, GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 589-596, 6th Annual IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2016, Seattle, United States, 10/13/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2016.7857339

Inexpensive urinalysis test strips to screen for diabetes in developing countries. / Arnett, Nathan; Vergani, Alice; Winkler, Amanda; Ritter, Sarah C.; Mehta, Khanjan.

GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. p. 589-596 7857339 (GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Arnett N, Vergani A, Winkler A, Ritter SC, Mehta K. Inexpensive urinalysis test strips to screen for diabetes in developing countries. In GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2016. p. 589-596. 7857339. (GHTC 2016 - IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: Technology for the Benefit of Humanity, Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2016.7857339