Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior

Evidence of Genotype × Environment Interaction

Leslie D. Leve, D. C R Kerr, Daniel Shaw, Xiaojia Ge, Jenae Marie Neiderhiser, Laura V. Scaramella, John B. Reid, Rand Conger, David Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To further the understanding of the effects of early experiences, 9-month-old infants were observed during a frustration task. The analytical sample was composed of 348 linked triads of participants (adoptive parents, adopted child, and birth parent[s]) from a prospective adoption study. It was hypothesized that genetic risk for externalizing problems and affect dysregulation in the adoptive parents would independently and interactively predict a known precursor to externalizing problems: heightened infant attention to frustrating events. Results supported the moderation hypotheses involving adoptive mother affect dysregulation: Infants at genetic risk showed heightened attention to frustrating events only when the adoptive mother had higher levels of anxious and depressive symptoms. The Genotype × Environment interaction pattern held when substance use during pregnancy was considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-356
Number of pages17
JournalChild development
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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adoptive parents
infant
Genotype
interaction
Parents
Mothers
evidence
adopted child
interaction pattern
Frustration
event
frustration
pregnancy
parents
Parturition
Prospective Studies
Depression
Pregnancy
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

Leve, Leslie D. ; Kerr, D. C R ; Shaw, Daniel ; Ge, Xiaojia ; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie ; Scaramella, Laura V. ; Reid, John B. ; Conger, Rand ; Reiss, David. / Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior : Evidence of Genotype × Environment Interaction. In: Child development. 2010 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 340-356.
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Leve, LD, Kerr, DCR, Shaw, D, Ge, X, Neiderhiser, JM, Scaramella, LV, Reid, JB, Conger, R & Reiss, D 2010, 'Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior: Evidence of Genotype × Environment Interaction', Child development, vol. 81, no. 1, pp. 340-356. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01398.x

Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior : Evidence of Genotype × Environment Interaction. / Leve, Leslie D.; Kerr, D. C R; Shaw, Daniel; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reid, John B.; Conger, Rand; Reiss, David.

In: Child development, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 340-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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