Infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly share demographic features with infants who die with retinal and dural bleeding: a review of neural mechanisms

Waney Squier, Julie Mack, Anna C. Jansen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cause of death in infants who die suddenly and unexpectedly (sudden unexpected death in infancy [SUDI]) remains a diagnostic challenge. Some infants have identified diseases (explained SUDI); those without explanation are called sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Demographic data indicate subgroups among SUDI and SIDS cases, such as unsafe sleeping and apparent life-threatening events. Infants dying suddenly with retinal and dural bleeding are often classified as abused, but in many there is no evidence of trauma. Demographic features suggest that they may represent a further subgroup of SUDI. This review examines the neuropathological hypotheses to explain SIDS and highlights the interaction of infant oxygen-conserving reflexes with the brainstem networks considered responsible for SIDS. We consider sex- and age-specific vulnerabilities related to dural bleeding and how sensitization of the dural innervation by bleeding may influence these reflexes, potentially leading to collapse or even death after otherwise trivial insults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1223-1234
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume58
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Sudden Infant Death
Sudden Death
Demography
Hemorrhage
Reflex
Brain Stem
Cause of Death
Oxygen
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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Infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly share demographic features with infants who die with retinal and dural bleeding : a review of neural mechanisms. / Squier, Waney; Mack, Julie; Jansen, Anna C.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 58, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1223-1234.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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