Influence of confined fluids on nanoparticle-to-surroundings energy transfer

Anne Marie Dowgiallo, Kenneth Knappenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Energy transfer from photoexcited nanoparticles to their surroundings was studied for both hollow and solid gold nanospheres (HGNs and SGNs, respectively) using femtosecond time-resolved transient extinction spectroscopy. HGNs having outer diameters ranging from 17 to 78 nm and fluid-filled cavities were synthesized by a sacrificial galvanic replacement method. The HGNs exhibited energy transfer half times that ranged from 105 ± 10 ps to 1010 ± 80 ps as the total particle surface area increased from 1005 to 28 115 nm 2. These data showed behaviors that were categorized into two classes: energy transfer from HGNs to interior fluids that were confined to cavities with radii <15 nm and ≥15 nm. Energy transfer times were also determined for solid gold nanospheres (SGNs) having radii spanning 9-30 nm, with a similar size dependence where the relaxation times increased from 140 ± 10 to 310 ± 15 ps with increasing nanoparticle size. Analysis of the size-dependent energy transfer half times revealed that the distinct relaxation rate constants observed for particle-to-surroundings energy transfer for HGNs with small cavities were the result of reduced thermal conductivity of confined fluids. These data indicate that the thermal conductivity of HGN cavity-confined fluids is approximately one-half as great as it is for bulk liquid water. For all HGNs and SGNs studied, energy dissipation through the solvent and transfer across the particle/surroundings interface both contributed to the energy relaxation process. The current data illustrated the potential of fluid-filled hollow nanostructures to gain insight into the properties of confined fluids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19393-19400
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume134
Issue number47
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2012

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Energy Transfer
Nanoparticles
Energy transfer
Nanospheres
Gold
Fluids
Thermal Conductivity
Thermal conductivity
Nanostructures
Relaxation processes
Relaxation time
Rate constants
Spectrum Analysis
Energy dissipation
Spectroscopy
Water
Liquids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Energy transfer from photoexcited nanoparticles to their surroundings was studied for both hollow and solid gold nanospheres (HGNs and SGNs, respectively) using femtosecond time-resolved transient extinction spectroscopy. HGNs having outer diameters ranging from 17 to 78 nm and fluid-filled cavities were synthesized by a sacrificial galvanic replacement method. The HGNs exhibited energy transfer half times that ranged from 105 ± 10 ps to 1010 ± 80 ps as the total particle surface area increased from 1005 to 28 115 nm 2. These data showed behaviors that were categorized into two classes: energy transfer from HGNs to interior fluids that were confined to cavities with radii <15 nm and ≥15 nm. Energy transfer times were also determined for solid gold nanospheres (SGNs) having radii spanning 9-30 nm, with a similar size dependence where the relaxation times increased from 140 ± 10 to 310 ± 15 ps with increasing nanoparticle size. Analysis of the size-dependent energy transfer half times revealed that the distinct relaxation rate constants observed for particle-to-surroundings energy transfer for HGNs with small cavities were the result of reduced thermal conductivity of confined fluids. These data indicate that the thermal conductivity of HGN cavity-confined fluids is approximately one-half as great as it is for bulk liquid water. For all HGNs and SGNs studied, energy dissipation through the solvent and transfer across the particle/surroundings interface both contributed to the energy relaxation process. The current data illustrated the potential of fluid-filled hollow nanostructures to gain insight into the properties of confined fluids.",
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Influence of confined fluids on nanoparticle-to-surroundings energy transfer. / Dowgiallo, Anne Marie; Knappenberger, Kenneth.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 134, No. 47, 28.11.2012, p. 19393-19400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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