Influence of different iodide salts on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells containing phosphazene-based nonvolatile electrolytes

Seung Hyun Anna Lee, Anne Martine S. Jackson, Andrew Hess, Shih To Fei, Sean M. Pursel, James Basham, Craig A. Grimes, Mark W. Horn, Harry R. Allcock, Thomas E. Mallouk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Polyphosphazene-based electrolytes containing different iodide salts were studied as components of dyesensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Electrolytes based on hexa[methoxyethoxyethoxycyclotriphosphazene] (MEE trimer) with dissolved LiI, NaI, NH4I, and 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium (PMII) and I2 were examined by ac conductivity and steady-state voltammetry. These measurements gave the individual conductivities of I-, I3 -, and cations in each electrolyte as a function of salt concentration. The anionic conductivities were highest in the PMII system and decreased in the order PMII > NH4I > NaI > LiI. Photovoltaic measurements of DSSCs containing these electrolytes showed the same order of performance, and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) under open circuit and forward bias conditions were used to study the separate impedance components of the cells. High polymeric polyphosphazene-plasticizer blends with a dissolved PMII/I 2 electrolyte gave better performance in DSSCs than equivalent poly(ethylene oxide)-plasticizer electrolytes. Although the efficiencies of these DSSCs were low (1.9%), this study identified the primary loss mechanisms and suggested possible avenues for designing more efficient polyphosphazene- based cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15234-15242
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry C
Volume114
Issue number35
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 9 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Energy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

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